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George Torok

Most Outrageous Government Board Meeting EVER!!!

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Executive Speech Coach, Business presentation tips from George Torok, the Speech Coach for Executives

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Business in Motion
Weekly radio show
Host: George Torok
www.BusinessinMotion.ca

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Ocean’s 11 vs Goliath


Enjoyed watching Oceans 13 again. I also enjoyed Oceans 11. Oceans 12 not so much.
They all had the same main set of stars – George Clooney, Brad Pitt and Matt Damon along with the rest of the crew.
Ocean's 13 vs the Casinos

Naturally I found myself on the side of the thieves. I wanted them to win and I wanted to be on their team. Why? They exhibited a team comradery that few workplace teams experience. They faced impossible odds as many of us feel we face. More importantly, they challenged the establishment as many would like to. This band of thieves tackled the biggest casinos in Las Vegas.
It’s easy to perceive the Las Vegas casinos as bigger and more powerful thieves. They make the rules and they win most of the money. Guess why the mob embraced and developed Las Vegas?
George Clooney and his gang take on the casinos. It was the David and Goliath battle.  
Many of us would love to beat the big corporations – the banks, phone companies, cable providers, airlines, grocery stores, pharmaceuticals, credit card bandits, insurance firms, oil companies and especially governments.

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Jim Estill, CEO of Danby Appliances – video

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Change Expert, Peter de Jager interviewed on Business In Motion

Watch and listen to this interview with change expert and keynote speaker, Peter de Jager talking candidly about change on radio show, Business In Motion.
 

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Are Your Meetings a Features of Membership?


The ROI of Membership

By Ed Rigsbee, CAE, CSP

Here is the bitter pill…if non-members can attend…the meeting is not a feature of membership. However, the discount on registration is.
Nearly every membership organization can further its mission more effectively, with more members. More members generally translate to larger meetings. To recruit more members, especially Millennials, there must be an outstanding perceived return on investment (ROI) offered.

Contemporary membership research, surveys, and reports all indicate that many membership organizations are challenged with trying to justify why one should join their ranks. There is the good old admonishment, “Join to support your industry.” This has become increasingly ineffective.  Let’s not forget the old standby, ”We have great networking.” Perhaps your organization has progressed to a more contemporary “We have great live and online communities”?

Yet, something is still missing…a truly compelling reason to join. What’s an association executive or director of membership to do?

Accelerate Your Action

In order to grow your membership and member meeting attendance, perhaps it is time to push against conventional wisdom and look in a new direction? Consider the inaccuracy that most of what is offered up by membership organizations as “member benefits” are in fact, features—perhaps features of membership. For an organization’s services, activities, or other things to be considered “features of membership” said services or activities must be available only to members.

Industry benefit activities are those things, like advocacy, that create great value for everyone in the industry—not just the members. These activities are great customer service accomplishments for the longer-term members that care about them. However, they are quite ineffective in recruiting new members—because they receive the value without having to become a member.

Show Me the Money

While advocacy generally is not a feature of membership, a legislative update…distributed only to members clearly is a membership feature which will save the member time, money, and avoidance of regulatory pain…all buying motives. These buying motives are the actual benefit…the things that make your members’ lives better…the things that will motivate non-members to join. Like the above mentioned feature of membership, discount on meeting registration, saving money is the benefit and not the meeting.

Motivating Features

Consider grabbing the opportunity to drive more value, more member ROI, for members at your meeting. There is currently much discussion in the meetings industry about “meeting ROI” but very little about “member ROI.” What the members get in exchange for their annual dues should be important to any association executive. To effectively increase “member ROI” at any of your meetings, consider including in your scheduled offering a number of “member-only” educational, networking, and/or social sessions. You will find this most effective at times when multiple activities are taking place at the meeting so there will be something for non-members to do. And, remember to develop some specific member-only education or activities for your long-term members. They need more than simply a place to see their friends once a year.

As you now know, it is only the registration discount that is the true feature of membership. Add to this feature some member-only activities and those activities also become features of membership. You will greatly increase the total perceived member ROI (member-only). You will be offering your current members more compelling reasons to attend your meetings and to retain their membership. For the non-members, this is like the take-away close—a powerful reason for the non-member to join your organization.

Influence the Decision to Join

There is no advantage in vague or fuzzy-bunny “member value proposition” marketing. In order to grow your membership base, which will increase your opportunity to influence more members to attend your meetings; it is crucial that your organization clearly communicate its member value proposition. A reasonably easy and inexpensive way to achieve this goal is to calculate the member-perceived real-dollar value of each “member-only” feature of membership. Communicating your organization’s real-dollar member ROI via your website and other marketing channels, both printed and electronic, will go a long way to telling your value proposition story and influencing the decision to join.

Give ‘em What They Want

There is the question of which segment(s) you will get the best “bang for your buck” in influencing both membership and meeting attendance? Generally it will be those people that are newer to the industry. They truly have the most to gain from membership. To influence this segment, you have to communicate how it is in their best interest to participate with your organization. During recruitment, is not the time for talking to these younger people about all the great value the organization delivers to the industry. There will be plenty of time for that after they have engaged in your organization and will better understand the value. 
Now is the time to communicate the great value that your organization delivers to its members—the ROI of membership based on each member-only feature. It is your job to help them understand the real-dollar value of each of these features of membership that your organization offers. This will hopefully include a number of new “member-only” activities at your upcoming meetings.

If you would like to explore further, the financial veracity of each of your features of membership for consideration in creating new, maintaining existing, and sun setting your various products, services, and activities, email your request to ed@rigsbee.com and I’ll forward back my Features Framework Exercise from The ROI of Membership-Today’s Missing Link for Explosive Growth

Copyright © 2015 Ed Rigsbee
Ed Rigsbee holds both the Certified Association Executive and the Certified Speaking Professional accreditations—an honor that only about a handful of people globally enjoy. Many of the ideas in this article are adapted from his book titled, The ROI of Membership-Today’s Missing Link for Explosive Growth.  In addition to teaching associations the qualitative process for determining member ROI and strategy, he is the CEO of Cigar PEG-Philanthropy through Fun, a non-profit public charity he founded in 1999. More about Ed’s work at www.rigsbee.com

Ed Rigsbee, CSP, CAE
The ROI Guy: Alliances, Relationships & Associations
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_8dWTxWtpA8
Rigsbee Enterprises, Inc.
1746 Calle Yucca, Suite 200
Thousand Oaks, CA 91360
www.Rigsbee.com
ed@rigsbee.com
805-498-5720

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Ken Robinson ons creativity TED Talk video

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Business in Motion: Insights from Business Leaders 2014-03-02 16:36:00

CFMU community radio looking for your support

Okay, I’m not the most interesting man in the world.  I’m probably not even the most interesting man in this room, and I’m the only one here.  Yet one thing’s for sure – I work at the most interesting radio station in Hamilton.  We are 93.3 CFMU FM – listener-supported, campus-based community radio.

CFMU broadcasts to the greater Hamilton area.  Our programs are produced and hosted by volunteers from the community – by people like yourself.  We address local issues, promote local and under-represented music, and feature unique voices.  We give voice to those who need it.

Last year, we received our seventh Radio Station of the Year Award, grew our social media presence by 99%, started a blog (cfmu.wordpress.com), and had a physical presence at many events on campus and across the city.  Our on-site Supercrawl broadcast was the most successful to date, and featured many high-profile guests.  Most importantly, our campus profile has taken a leap forward and volunteer participation has expanded by over 30%. CFMU is more interesting and valuable than ever.

We are asking our fellow Hamiltonians to offer assistance in any way they are able: donations; promotions; sharing our campaign banner; spreading the word; or any other suggestions you may have in helping us reach our goal.

Additionally, we’d like you to consider pledging to this year’s drive and supporting our campaign. In order to save paper we are sending our request in digital form.  If you choose to support us in 2014, click on the “Donate” button on this page to pay by PayPal, or email me – Jamie Tennant, Program Director, at jtennant@msu.mcmaster.ca.

Keep radio interesting – support 93.3 CFMU.

Click here to donate to CFMU

PS: If you’ve been a guest on Business In Motion or you have listened – then consider contributing to CFMU because it is community radio. Over 150 volunteers keep the station running 24/7.

Any amount is welcome. Please mention Business in Motion when you contribute.

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Interview with Robert Gignac on radio show, Business in Motion.

Who is Robert Gignac?
Co-author, along with Michael J. Townshend, of the book, Rich is a State of Mind.

What is the book about?
It is a fictional story about the lessons of personal finance as seen through the eyes of a humours disfunctional Canadian family.

Who is the book for?
Individuals aged 20 to 40 who are in the early stages of financial planning.  They will discover in an easy to understand, non-intimidating story why they should care about financial planning and what they should do about it.

Insights from this interview with Robert Gignac
First simple lesson is to live below your means. If you make $100, then spend no more than $90. Its the only way to enjoy a future  that allows you to do what you will want to do.
How do you make your dream real? First write it down. “What is your goal?” is the most important chapter in the book.

The best advice that Robert received from his financial planner was to start by saving $25 a month.
To save your money, put it where it is not easy to get at.

People will call you lucky if you are doing the things that they want to do but they believe that they can’t.
Robert wrote the first draft of the book long hand because while doing that he was not tempted to stop and edit. His brain told him to just keep writing and edit later.

Rich does not necessarily mean lots of money. One definition of “rich” is the density of hue in colour

Listen to this interview with Robert Gignac

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What do Successful People Have in Common?

Ask any successful businessman or woman and they will tell you the same thing. Their success is not something that happened by chance. Of course, being in the right place at the right time is crucial, but it is only half of the equation. Just as important is trusting your gut feelings, planning, not giving up, and following through with your ideas.
The Business in Motion radio show has spent years interviewing business leaders to find out what makes them successful. Whilst they may work in a variety of industries, and have very different personality types, there are similar themes running through almost all their stories. Lets take a look at some of these themes and pinpoint what they have in common, why they provide the foundation for success, and how they can help us to succeed. 
Following the advice of business leaders who have changed the world may not make you a success, but it is certainly a step in the right direction.

Surround Yourself With Brilliant People

Any business leader will happily admit that surrounding yourself with brilliant people is often the difference between success and failure. A true business leader is not threatened by talented people. They embrace the abilities of others and are always willing to listen to their input. They delegate and utilize the skill-set of their entire team and are never so stubborn that they refuse to change course when necessary.

An Innovation Need Not be Original

Although this may seem contradictory, true business leaders know they do not have to ‘reinvent the wheel’ to become successful. Perhaps the most revered business leader of our time was Steve Jobs. The company he founded in his bedroom has been credited, among other things, with inventing the personal computer, the MP3 player, the smartphone, and the tablet. Whilst, Jobs was a colossus in the information technology world, Apple invented none of those products. The invention of the personal computer is generally credited to Henry Edwards Roberts, whose Altair 8800 kickstarted the personal computer industry. 
A German technology company, Fraunhofer-Gesellshaf, manufactured the first MP3 player back in 1997, whilst IBM were ahead of their time and developed the first smartphone back in 1992. Admittedly, these products bare little resemblance to the electronic devices that went on to change the world, but the concept and early advances in technology were there for all to see. What of the personal tablet? Well, a strong argument could be made that Pencept developed that technology as long ago as 1985, whilst Microsoft ushered in the modern mobile computing age with it’s range of ‘tablet’ devices at the turn of the century.

Standing on the Shoulders of Others

What made Steve Jobs such a visionary was his talent for analyzing the current market, and being remarkably accurate in predicting what technologies would change the world and those that would end up ‘in the dustbin of history’. By standing on the shoulders of innovators that had gone before, and designing aesthetically pleasing, simple to use products, Apple became the company it is today. 
Bill Gates did a similar thing in the 1980’s with Microsoft. He agreed to a deal to license parts of Apple’s Macintosh GUI for a new piece of software Microsoft had written called Windows 1.0. The next version of Windows (2.0) resulted in Apple taking Microsoft to court for copyright infringement. The case lasted 4 years. The judge eventually dismissing Apples claim. Ironically, the Macintosh GUI was heavily influenced by work that had taken place at Xerox a decade earlier. 
Once again, we find successful companies need not lead the way as innovators. However, they do need to be in the right place at the right time, trust their instincts, understand the direction the market is heading, and market their product successfully.

The Importance of Advertising

One can have the best idea or product in the world, but unless you get the word out it will never be successful. Truly successful business leaders already know this. They promote their product through a variety of media. They understand that during a downturn in the economy this is more important than ever. 
Of course, a promotional campaign does not have to cost a fortune. Business start-ups should always allocate a proportion of their budget for promotional campaigns that get your message across in unique ways. Building a brand that the consumer instantly recognises is fundamental to this strategy. All true business leaders understand the importance of this. People do not just buy products. They buy into a brand and what it represents. It becomes a lifestyle choice, something that demonstrates to the outside world who they are, and what they believe in. 
Once again, Steve Jobs knew this. Apple, under his leadership, became the technology giant it is today not just because of its great products. People also bought into them because they believed Apple stood for something. IBM and Microsoft represented the status quo. Apple stood for the counter-culture and a fresh approach.

Branding, logos and a company slogan on office products or other advertising can help you stand out from the crowd. Smaller companies lack the experience and staffing levels to compete with the industry giants. However, with a creative approach it is quite possible to turn a disadvantage into an advantage. Office products can be tailored to sing the praises of a smaller company. For instance, the personal touch is often lost when doing business with large multi-nationals. Smaller businesses can point this out whilst designing their office products or other advertising campaigns. Finding a ‘niche’ market or audience can help level the  playing field. Successful branding can help a business achieve this.

Hard Work and Never Giving up

Perhaps the one quality that almost every successful business leader has is their capacity to work hard, believe in themselves, and a refusal to accept defeat. At some point, most of the true giants in the business world failed. What differentiates them from most of us is their ability to pick themselves up, dust themselves down, and learn from their mistakes. They turn failure into opportunity. Steve Jobs was once thrown off the board at Apple. Although despondent, he refused to stop believing in himself. He founded another computer start up company called NeXT, bought a computer graphics company and renamed it Pixar, and 13 years later was invited back to join an almost bankrupt Apple company. The rest is history.

Guest Post by 
Melissa Barry

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Entrepreneurs are Hot! What’s that about?

Enjoy this video of a radio broadcast from Business in Motion on 93.3 cfmu. Host George Torok talks about entrepreneurs and entrepreneurship.

What is an entrepreneur?
What motivates them?
Are you an entrepreneur?
What can you learn from them?


Enjoy this special program on Business in Motion


Entrepreneurs on BIM radio from George Torok on Vimeo.

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Richard Branson: Business Stripped Bare


Richard Branson: Business Stripped Bare

Book Review

I enjoyed reading this book by Richard Branson and I will read it again. Because Branson is a simple guy, the book was an easy read. Quick and easy to understand. So, I’m not re-reading it because I didn’t understand it – I will re-read it because it is inspiring.

Richard Branson is founder and head of the multi-billion dollar Virgin Group which includes over 300 companies. This book reads like an intimate journal of Richard Branson’s musings and anecdotes. It feels like you are chatting with Richard over a tea or beer. You’ll discover insights into his visions, fears, values, failures, triumphs and advice. It’s a worthwhile read.

These excerpts offer the insights from the book that resonated most with me:

 

On Entrepreneurship

 


You have to protect against the downside.

We all need to be aware that small, lean, entrepreneurial businesses are now the future of business.

I had never been interested in business. I’ve been interested in creating things.

Ethics aren’t just important in business. They are the whole point of business. We’re in business to make things. And when you decide what to make, that is an ethical decision.

We carefully research the Achilles heels of different global industries and only when we feel we can potentially turn an industry on its head, and fulfill our key roles as the consumers’ champion do we move in on it.

 

On Branding

Publicity is absolutely critical. You have to get your brand out and about particularly if you’re a consumer-oriented brand. You have to be willing to use yourself as well as your advertising budget to get your brand on the map. A good PR story is infinitely more effective than a full page advert and a damn sight cheaper.

For any business building a consumer brand, speaking to journalists is part of the deal.

There was little purpose in becoming the largest brand in the world. It was much more valuable to become the most respected.

If you don’t define what the brand stands for the competition will.

 

On Success

What you’re bad at actually doesn’t interest people, and it certainly shouldn’t interest you. However accomplished you become in life, the things you are bad at will always outnumber the things you are good at. So don’t let your limits knock your self-confidence. Push them to one side and push yourself to your strengths.


….

All of these selected excerpts offer revealing insights into the mind of Richard Branson and powerful advice for business success.

 

That last piece of advice on success is worth rereading.



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Are You a Greek or a Roman?

300 Spartans


I heard an intriguing comparison between the Greeks and the Romans. The Romans copied many ideas from the Greeks but the Roman Empire survived much longer than the Greek Empire. Perhaps the Romans learned from the Greek successes as well as their mistakes

The Greeks believed that it was honorable to die in battle. It meant that regardless of the conditions they must stand on the battle field and fight until they won or died.
The Romans wanted to win the war. That meant if they weren’t winning this battle they would withdraw, rethink and fight again another day.
Which are you and which would you rather be?
Perhaps you know some Greeks. They believe that they should honor their word at all costs. Being true to your word is a good thing. But what if you gave your promise while lacking important information, under duress or in a state of heightened emotion?
Many of us have made dumb promises. The most common one is “until death do us part”. Those promises were made in good faith at the time but things change. It’s not just marriage that can be a bad promise. There are many other promises that we make throughout life that might need to be revisited.
You can think like a Greek and stand fighting to death until one of you dies. Or you can be a Roman, retreat, rethink and fight a different battle. The Romans weren’t cowards. They were good strategists.
Sometimes we make impossible promises to a boss, customer or employee. We simply need to revisit reality, deal with the disappointment and move on. Some battles you can’t win today.
PS: This post isn’t meant to disparage people of Greek origin. The analogy seemed worth repeating. It’s ancient history and there might be a valid lesson in there.
PPS: Remember the 300 Spartans. They fought bravely and they all died.

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Innovation is Not The Answer

Innovation is not the holy grail of business success that many gurus claim it is.

“We went from zero to 2 Billion and we never had an original idea.”
Jim Estill, speaking at TEDx Times Square
Jim Estill built his first business on two unoriginal ideas – courtesy and strong work ethic.
He later started another business during his last year in university by accident. He built that business to one with $2 billion in sales. Along the way he didn’t innovate. He simply learned and copied from others. His point is that it’s not the ideas that matter it’s all in the implementation.
Action counts.
Coupled closely with that action is the speed of action. Urgency is more important than perfection. You can probably talk about successful companies and individuals who are far from perfect. They didn’t let the lack of perfection stop them from acting.
Although Jim didn’t mention it in this talk, one of his mantras is “Fail fast, fail often and fail cheap”.
Don’t worry about the possibility of bruises and scrapped knees get on the bike and ride it.
Enjoy the video below. Jim’s presentation starts about six minutes in and it’s only about seven minutes long.

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Virtual Assistants, interview on Business in Motion

Interview with Virtual Assistants

Guests: Jenn Kubillis of JK Business Services & Jacquie Manore of Workload Solution Services
Members of the Golden Horseshoe Virtual Assistants Group www.GHVAG.ca

Insights from this Interview

Outsourced adminstrative assistants – evolved out of the corporate secretarial roles. Now much more than secretaries.

Work with small and medium sized business.

Do what you love and hire the rest out to virtual assistants.
Online convention for Virtural assistants the week of May 16 – 21. Follow the convention at www.OIVAC.com

Even virtual assistants need to get out of bed, take a shower and get out to meet the world.
Becoming a VA is a viable career choice.

Radio interview with host George Torok on Business in Motion

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What it Means to be an Entrepreneur in 2013

Gutenberg printing press on BIM
Gutenberg Printing Press
An entrepreneur is a visionary; someone who sees the world as it could be with the introduction of some new product or service. Gutenberg brought the printing press to spread information. Franklin brought electricity to light and power our homes. Bill Gatesbrought personal computers and Steve Jobs made them attractive, along with introducing us to the ipod, iphone and ipad. Each of these great entrepreneurs made life easier for the common citizen and very profitable for himself.
While the essential qualities possessed by an entrepreneur remain constant over time – ambition, above average risk tolerance, persistence and work ethic, to name a few – the landscape in which today’s entrepreneurs operate has changed significantly.  This change has important implications for what it means to start a new business. 
The internet has shrunk the world in a very real sense, bringing Marshall McLuhan’s notion of the global village to light. People are connecting and communities springing up across borders, oceans and continents. Facebook groups comprised of members from all over the world exist on interests ranging from knitting to bungee jumping (https://www.facebook.com/bungyhilmi).
Through the internet and social media, it’s less expensive to start a new business; new options exist to raise capital; and there are powerful, accessible platforms with which to communicate directly to potential consumers without paying a cent. 
The Reshaping of Business and Commerce
Starting a business doesn’t need to be expensive:
All you really need to get started is an idea, a plan and a website. Your web page is your storefront, and it’s a lot cheaper than renting or purchasing a bricks and mortar space. It’s where your customers come to shop, interact with your brand, and purchase whatever it is your selling. Luring customers onto your site is achieved through online promotion. This includes Search Engine Optimization (SEO), which can be done for free, social media, which can and should be used to interact with potential customers, and paid online advertisements.    
New options to raise capital:
Websites like Kickstarter allow entrepreneurs to raise capital to start their businesses without giving up ownership in the form of stock, or owing money on loans. If you have a good idea, present it well, and people believe in it, Kickstarter is a great option to look into (http://www.kickstarter.com/help/faq/kickstarter%20basics?ref=nav)
New platforms to promote:
Social media is a powerful way to promote online and it’s free. If you haven’t already, create an account on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. Learning to harness these tools to yield results (i.e., pull customers into your website) will take some time, but is well worth the personal investment.
How to Take Advantage
The internet is a great thing for Entrepreneurs. It encourages creativity by reducing the risks and financial barriers involved in taking a chance on your visionary idea. Take advantage: go build a website, open a Twitter account, and start working on your new business today. 
Matthew Moses (info@biztoolz.ca) is an editor and regular contributor at www.biztoolz.ca, which provides tools and resources for Entrepreneurs. 

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Kathy Bardswick, The Co-Operators Group, Interview

Guest of Business in Motion

Radio interview with Kathy Bardswick, President and CEO of the Co-Operators Group.

Kathy Bardswick has been with the Co-Operators for 32 years. She worked her way through various roles with the company. A working mom with four children she was inspired by her own mother (with six children) who encouraged her to pursue her dreams. Kathy earned her MBA at McMaster University.
—————————–
Inisghts from this interview with Kathy Bardswick

The Co-Operators is a co-operative that is owned by 47 other like-minded co-operatives.
Each owner owns an equal share. The share value does not change which means that the company does not focus on driving share value.

They are in the business of offering financial security for Canadians along with peace of mind for the ups and downs of life.

Co-operators was formed to meet unmet needs in 1945 by Saskachewan farmers who were unable to buy insurance from the traditional insurers.

It is run democratically in that everyone has a voice – yet people are held accountable.
A big concern and worry is the sustainability of our world environment and the quality of life. The increasing gap between rich and poor does not bode well.

Youth Sustainability Conference – an opportunity for students to leverage their passion for sustainability.
We have reduced our internal footprint by 22%. The next goal is 50% and the step after that is to be carbon neutral.

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Collection agency harassed debt-free Canadians

Hundreds of complaints filed across country against iQor Canada

Employees of one of Canada’s largest debt collection agencies, iQor Canada, have routinely and sometimes knowingly contacted people who did not owe debt, a practice for which the company has been fined several times this year, a CBC News investigation has found.

Hundreds of complaints have been filed over the past few years about iQor Canada to provincial consumer affairs agencies, the federal telecommunications regulator CRTC, and the RCMP Anti-Fraud Squad, many stemming from repeated phone calls to people who don’t owe any money.

Former employees told CBC News about calling non-debtors — including relatives of debtors and unrelated people with a similar last name to a debtor.

“We would just keep calling them and calling them and calling them,” a former employee told CBC News.
The insider, who spoke on the condition of anonymity, said that in some cases the debt collection agency only had the last name of a debtor and would call everyone with the same last name in the general geographical vicinity.

“[The company] just pays us to call them and we call them and we don’t bother with if it’s honest or not,” said the former iQor worker.

The former employee said he believed some people even paid for debts they never owed.

Read the rest of Collection Agency Harassment

By Alex Shprintsen and Annie Burns-Pieper, CBC News

Read about Collections Agencies on the Ontraio Government Site

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Richard Branson on How to Start an Airline

In this TV interview in Egypt, Richard Branson, talks about the importance of branding. He also reveals why and how he started Virgin Air.

His brash take-charge action demonstrates the trait of successful entrepreneurs. They act to fix things because they believe in a better way to get things done.

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7 Reasons You Can’t Be an Entrepreneur with Bad Credit

Bad Credit on Entrepreneurs
The hardest thing about being an entrepreneur is getting people to latch on to your business idea. As great as it may be, when it comes to finding financing and investors, you need much more than a great idea to get others to put their own money into your project. This becomes much more difficult if you, yourself, are not in good financial standing personally. We all have mistakes looming in our financial records, but, if your credit score is dangerously low, you may not be able to start a new business anytime soon. Here are some reasons why:

1. It will be difficult to find investors.
Investors don’t just want to look at your business plan; they want to look at the whole picture. Anyone who is considering investing a major amount of money into your idea will desire as much information about your financial background as possible. If you can’t take care of your own finances, how can you be expected to manage a business? You will need an extraordinarily brilliant business concept to make up for bad credit, if you want to secure an investor.

2. Your co-signers might be dried out.
If you’ve had credit issues in the past, there is a good chance you also had to go to friends and family for loans. It’s difficult to find yourself out of cash suddenly, and most of us with poor credit scores have had to go through some sort of financial downturn in order to get there. But, when it comes time to now start your business, you will need to finance some of the expenses. If you have bad credit, and the people in your life are reluctant to continue supporting you financially, you could be out of luck.

3. You look like a risk to banks.
This is a big one. Even if you do get investors, there is a good chance you will need to take out some form of small business loan from a bank. Entrepreneurs with bad credit are turned away from banks on a daily basis. You can’t expect your case to be much different.

4. Securing small business credit cards will be difficult.
There are plenty of credit cards that can be granted on the spot, even with bad credit. The only problem with them is they typically have hidden fees and crazy-high interest rates. If you want to secure a legitimate business credit card, then you may have trouble taking out more credit if you are already maxed out on some cards or lacking in upstanding credit in other ways.

5. Financing business equipment will be more expensive.
No matter what you need to do to run your business, you will probably need to purchase some amount of equipment. From trucks to printers to baking supplies, there is no end to the expenses that come with daily business operations.

6. You will need extra resources for down payments.
Even if you do secure financing for business items, credit cards, or loans, there is a very high possibility that you will have to pay much more up front than you can afford. A substantial down payment is often required of borrowers with low credit scores, so if your credit is bad, this is another area where you will have to cough up some extra cash.

7. You may not get the office space you need.
Another important part of running a business is having a space to do it in. Just as you may have problems securing loans and lines of credit, you could have equally trying times getting someone to rent you a space to work. Property managers want to make sure they are taking on residents who are financially responsible and have very few late pays on their records.
—————————
Stella Walker is a writer for Creditscore.net and an avid researcher of credit and insurance news. She is especially passionate about protecting consumers from credit card scam and providing information about good credit standing.

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Creative Problem Solving: How to Ask Better Questions

The Creative Problem Solving process is about asking the right questions at the right time – and listening to the answers without judging.

Enjoy this video as Creativity Catalyst, George Torok, offers tips on how to ask better question along the creative problem solving path.

In what ways might you…?

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Benefits of Leasing

Leasing
Lease financing may be a smart way for business owners to acquire the modern technology they need to be competitive while preserving capital to invest into other key areas of the business


Assuming your company is in the business to turn a profit, not just to acquire assets, equipment Lease Financing has its benefits…
ü     Leasing provides up to 100% financing of the equipment cost.
ü     Working capital & lines of credit remain free for other uses.
ü     Credit decisions are generally very quick, often the same day.
ü     Fixed rental for the term of the lease.
ü     Pre-determined purchase option is standard with our lease.
ü     Hedge against inflation.   
ü     Trade-in or upgrade your equipment as technology improves.
ü     Simplifies bookkeeping  –  rentals are fixed
ü     Tax Savings – Lease rentals may be 100% deductible 
ü     Simple documentation
ü     Personal guarantees rarely required for established businesses.
ü     Flexibility – Rental schedules may be tailored to fit cash flow needs.
ü     No time wasted visiting a bank office or other institution.
ü     HST is paid on the rental, instead of up front.
ü     Modern equipment can be acquired immediately adding to your cash flow & productivity.
ü     Facilitates budgeting – costs are known
ü     Deals under $30,000 require only a clean credit report
ü     Current model used equipment will also be considered
ü     Any type of business entity, large or small qualifies
          …each leasing situation is different, just as every company is different.
Contact the experts at Lease-Line to-day!

www.lease-line.com
art@lease-line.com

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Choose To Be Happy

Guest Post by WAYNE VANWYCK

“Most folks are about as happy as they make up their minds to be.” ~  Abraham Lincoln

 

When my daughter was about nine and preparing for school, she stomped her feet angrily and declared, “I hate static cling!” I laughed out loud, struck by the absurdity of this disgruntled pronouncement and I gave her a hug, “Static cling doesn’t care if you hate it. Being upset and angry at static cling will in no way change how it behaves. There is no use being upset. The question is, what can you do about it?”
Getting angry at something you can do nothing about is a waste of time and energy. It just makes you look foolish. The real question is; what can you do about it.
For years, in our programs, we’ve been teaching that if you don’t like something, you only have three reasonable choices:
  1. Do everything in your power to change it.
  2. Accept it the way it is.
  3. Remove yourself from the situation.
However, although it makes little or no sense, many people choose a fourth response – they complain.
There are several common statements that slip into the conversation of the average salesperson:
  • I hate traffic jams
  • I hate technology
  • I hate this lousy weather
  • I hate this recession
Like static cling, these are conditions over which you have little or no control. Traffic, technology, and weather don’t care if you like them or not. Consider whether you can do anything to change what is irritating you. If not, accept it or remove yourself, because complaining is negative and demoralizing to you and the people with whom you share your grumblings.
Of course, there are circumstances over which you can exercise some control:
  • I hate making cold calls
  • I hate being stood up on an appointment
  • I hate asking for referrals
It doesn’t matter if you like them or not! Can you do anything to change the situation? If you hate doing what’s required to be a successful salesperson, perhaps you’re in the wrong job. Change.
If you don’t like being stood up on appointments and it happens frequently, ask yourself what you’re doing that may be causing this. Are the appointments firm or tentative? Are you confirming them before you go? If you’re driving a long distance to this appointment, are you preparing a back-up plan, perhaps arranging alternatives if the appointment is a bust? Do everything you can to change the situation.
With allowances for clinical depression, most of us can choose whether to be happy or angry, satisfied or dissatisfied. We can observe the same situation through a different lens and interpret it to make us either happy or miserable. If you want to be happy, make up your mind to be happy. Why would you choose otherwise?

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How to Handle Junk Mail

By Harold Taylor 

Larry J. Sabato, in an article, Mailing for Dollars, in an old issue of Psychology Today, refers to a survey that showed that 63 percent of the people really look forward to receiving mail.  Even more than they look forward to daily activities such as watching television, hobbies, eating dinner and sleeping!  He also mentions another survey that revealed that 75 percent of the people who receive political mailings actually read them.

Contrary to the popular belief that most junk mail ends up in the wastebasket unopened, it doesn’t – at least not until it has grabbed your attention and consumed some of your time.  To increase the likelihood of your perusing these unsolicited mailings, such ploys are used as personalized envelopes, “live” stamps, return postage, teaser copy, red ink, creative copy, and a personalized, conversational tone.

Direct-mail consultants spend their time devising new ways of getting you to spend your own time – and money – on various products and services offered.  Although I don’t recommend you throw out all junk mail unopened, since much of it could be useful and profitable, you should be selective.  If you recognize from the envelope that the product the product or service is one you don’t need or want, discard it unopened.  Otherwise, you’ll be trapped into sorting through the interesting, colorful inserts that are designed to capture your interest.

 It can become very time-consuming when the direct marketers don’t take the trouble to eliminate duplication.  If you receive two or three identical envelopes from the same mailer, take a minute to scribble “Return to sender” on the unopened envelope.  On the duplicates, add the statement “please remove name from mailing list.”  Or have a self-inking stamp made up that says it for you.  

Unsolicited material can be valuable, keep you updated on what’s new on the market, and give you some great ideas for increasing productivity in your firm.  But it is also designed to attract your attention.  So spend as little time on it as possible.  Be ruthless with those you open.  If their value is in doubt at all, scrap them quickly.  Resist the urge to read further or hold them over until later.  And don’t circulate the material to others unless you can see immediate use for it.  When you do send material to others, note exactly what you want done and whether the material should be retained or scrapped.

File material you want to retain; but not in a permanent file system.  Place it in a follow-up file or idea file for future action.  Record the reason you are keeping it.  Discard inserts that are unnecessary and staple the other material together.  Don’t file loose or paper clipped material.  On the pre-determined date, review it and take action.  Resist the urge to re-file it.  If you don’t have time to do anything about it or have second thoughts about its value, scrap it.  Err on the side of tossing too much, never too little.

If you find the junk mail is consuming too much time, and keeping you from the priority items, have it separated from the other materials and placed in a folder of its own.  Then, regardless of when you review your mail, leave the folder until the end.  If you have used up your allocated mail time without having gone through the junk mail, no harm done.  Leave it until tomorrow.

You might even leave the folder of junk mail until fifteen minutes before quitting time.  You are normally winding down by then, and in no mood for priority tasks that require mental alertness.  With only junk mail standing between you and the evening meal or leisure time, you tend not to dawdle over those eye-appealing folders.  The secret is to review all junk mail, but do it quickly, without allowing it to infringe on priority time that could be used for priority tasks. 

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Creative Problem Solving: Why we have rules and how to examine them

Creative problem solving often means you need to face, examine and tangle with rules. It helps if you understand why rules exist and how to uncover the reason behind the rules.

Enjoy this video from Creativity Catalyst, George Torok as he discusses how to approach rules in Creative Problem Solving.

Warning: Some ideas expressed will offend some people. Stupid people need not watch this video.

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Disaster-Recovery Insurance: Preparing for the Worst to Avoid an Expensive Mistake

Disaster Insurance for Business

“Expect the unexpected” is an old axiom that has global applications. It’s a piece of advice that falls into the same category of Murphy’s Law, the familiar, though pessimistic, adage that predicts, “Anything that can go wrong, will go wrong.”

Business owners often prepare for the worst and hope for the best. Large companies hire risk managers who predict risks and put together custom coverage plans, but small business owners must rely on their own knowledge or an agent to assist in creating plans. Even professionals can’t foresee natural disasters or other unexpected crises, which makes disaster-recovery insurance a must for small businesses with large investments in property or inventory.

A 2010 survey conducted by Travelers Insurance revealed that 94 percent of small business owners are confident that their business is protected against insurable risks; however, only 56 percent of those surveyed had disaster-recovery insurance.

Business owners without disaster-recovery insurance may not realize that their standard property insurance fails to cover disasters such as flooding, terrorism or other external circumstances that disrupt day-to-day operations. Unfortunately, this gap in coverage could have drastic consequences. According to federal statistics, 43 percent of businesses that close due to a natural disaster remain permanently closed; and 29 percent close in the following 2 years.

Natural disasters aren’t the only unpredictable risk factors. For example, would you be covered if a water main broke and flooded your building?  A business owner who has business interruption insurance will receive reimbursement for lost income in addition to necessary funds to repair damages. This business owner can retain employees while the property undergoes repairs. The employer without this type of coverage would be forced to lay off employees until repairs are completed – or to pay employees out-of-pocket.

Many small business owners purchase a standard Business Owners Policy or BOP, without researching the different areas of coverage. This may be why only 56 percent of business owners surveyed by Travelers Insurance were covered with disaster-recovery insurance. Though business owners may assume their property is protected against the unexpected, a standard BOP may be limited to maintenance and restoration. 

For small business owners who are not heavily invested in property or inventory, business interruption insurance may not be essential. However, this does not exclude the home-based business. Many independent business owners who work from home have admitted to having no extra insurance, falsely assuming that their homeowner’s insurance will be enough to protect against damages.

Most homeowner’s policies exclude business pursuits from coverage. Insurance claims filed to cover equipment, software or inventory could result in denial if an insurer were to tie the claim to a business venture. Home-based business owners who are interested in business interruption insurance should opt for a claim that includes an extra expense clause. The purpose of this clause would be to allow for the relocation of a business while the original property (the home) undergoes repairs.

Even though insurance is required to mitigate damages of the unexpected, sometimes purchasing insurance can come at a risk. A new business owner can overlook certain risks and find himself underinsured; while a business owner who chooses an unreliable agent could overspend on policies. Business owners who make self-education a priority can avoid such unnecessary and expensive mistakes.
——————————–

Carol Wilson is a versatile guest blogger who primarily writes about global business trends and finance. When she’s not writing for sites like www.businessinsurance.org, she enjoys hiking and fishing. If you have any questions or comments for Carol, please send them to wilson.carol24@gmail.com.

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Creative Problem Solving: The Two Step Principle

Creative Problem Solving starts by understanding and following the principle of differed judgement.

Enjoy this video from Creativity Catalyst, George Torok, as he talks about the DNA of creative problem solving.

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Creative Problem Solving – dealing with Two Types of Problems

How to distinguish and handle Acute and Chronic Problems.

In this video learn the difference between Acute and Chronic Problems and how to manage them differently.

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Time Management for Entrepreneurs

By Harold Taylor 

Time management for entrepreneurs involves more than simply trying to increase productivity through the better use of time. You must first determine what it is you want to accomplish, set specific goals, draw up guidelines, and avoid the countless temptations to stray from your original intent. To do this you will need a mission statement, annual goals and personal time policies.

Develop a mission statement.
A mission statement will give direction to your business and personal life. It will keep you focused on your reason for being in business and keep you from getting sidetracked by all the opportunities that are unrelated to your chosen profession. You can be good at a lot of things, but greatness requires focus. My advice is to choose an area of specialty, write a mission or vision statement, and set long-range and annual goals that are compatible with that mission.

Record your mission statement in the front of your planner where you will see it every time you open your planner to record an appointment or activity.  You might even put it on the front cover. It should be short and simple, such as “To help others succeed in business through better time management skills.”  

Set goals 
Limit your goals to five or six per year at any one time. This forces you to focus on the valuable few rather than jumping from one goal to another based on the whims of the moment. Too many goals are distracting.  You can always add new ones to the list as the others are completed. Write them in the front of your planner or in a special category of your To Do List on your Blackberry or other PDA.  They should be portable, so don’t limit them to a list on your desktop planner unless you spend your life in front of the computer. Assign deadline dates. One goal might be “To complete a book on Procrastination by July 30th.” Another might be “To have a fully operational website by October 15th.” Make sure these deadlines are realistic. Work backwards. If you want to complete a task by the end of the year, and it takes an estimated 100 hours to complete it, how many hours each week would you have to schedule in your planner in order to meet that deadline?  If the answer is 10 hours, based on your current level of activity that might be unrealistic. So change the deadline date. Once you have a workable plan, be sure to block off appointments with yourself to actually do the work. 

The goals that you write should all help to further your mission. In the example above, developing a time management workshop by April 30th would help; but purchasing a cabin cruiser by June 15th would not. However if your mission were to live in luxury for the rest of your life, the goal would be compatible.

Develop personal time policies
Personal time policies are guidelines that will help you make tough decisions regarding the budgeting of your time. Business policies are used in organizations to help employees make decisions on their own. Examples of business policies might be the customer is always right or we will not be undersold. Similarly, from a personal standpoint, it helps to have a set of personal time policies or value statements. These policies may be different for different individuals and may include statements such as:

  • I will not compromise my beliefs, values or personal mission. 
  • I will not become an activity packrat; for every new activity I take on, one of equal time-value must be subtracted. 
  • I will have as much respect for my own time as I have for other peoples’ time. 
  • Decisions or choices affecting my family will be discussed in advance with my family. 
  • I will not be coerced into changing my priorities; they will be changed only if my heart is in it. 

Policies such as these simply serve as guidelines when making decisions that affect your use of time. Personal time policies also help you to maintain balance in your life. You must also schedule personal and family activities into your planner as well.

Time planning for entrepreneurs involves a thoughtful consideration of why your company exists, what it is you want to accomplish through it, and how you plan to get there. Then any time efficiencies you practice will not be in vain. 

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Reducing Interruptions

By Harold Taylor 

Since interruptions are a major problem for most managers, and 80 percent of a manager’s interruptions come from about 20 percent of the staff members, you may want to try the following five suggestions to keep interruptions under control.

1. If certain people find it necessary to interrupt you frequently, schedule brief, five-minute stand-up meetings with these people each morning to improve communications. Have a question and answer session and let them know what’s happening that day.

2.  Keep a tally sheet on how often the various people interrupt you during a day. You’ll soon know who the time thieves are. Talk to the offenders to determine the reason, and ask for suggestions on how you can both save some time.

3. Set time limits for the frequent offenders. Example: “Is ten minutes sufficient, Bob? Or should we schedule more time later in the day (or week)?” Never allow open ended meetings. Always set deadlines. And be sure to allow extra time when scheduling projects to allow for the any unavoidable interruptions.

4. Don’t close your door for excessively long periods of time or people will think the only way that they can gain access to you is to interrupt you. Also, don’t store information in your office that people need to access frequently. Locate your in basket outside your office so people won’t have to interrupt you when they are simply delivering mail or correspondence to you. Be careful you don’t encourage interruptions.

5. When people barge in on you, use body language to indicate that you’re busy. Don’t be so quick to drop your pen, and lean back when these constant interrupters barge in.     

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Business Language Gets Dumb and Dumber

Dumb and silly business phrases
Silly Business Buzz Words
Seth Godin called them tribes. Most of us are members of official and unofficial clubs. The people within the club share common interests or common characteristics.
Have you noticed that every club creates its own code words? Perhaps the “secret” code words help strengthen the appearance of a common bond. Sometimes the code is an acronym. Often it’s an overused cliché.
The unofficial club or tribe of business has more than its share of silly phrases and terms. Business seems to borrow many phrases from warfare and sports.
  • Hit a home run
  • The whole nine yards
  • Dive right in
  • Make a big splash
  • Raise the bar

Recently I’ve heard the phrase “let’s circle back on that”. It sounds silly. I think they meant, “let’s discuss this later”.
Impactful” is just dumb. It makes me think of a meter crater. “Think outside the box” is overdone and an example of not being creative. “Driving the bus” drives me crazy. 
Often those silly buzz words are repeated by staff as they mimic the boss.
And it looks like business schools are indoctrinating business graduates with those annoying terms during their education. And to think that it’s called higher learning.
Check this post to check your own language before your next meeting, presentation, interview or phone call.

The Silliest Buzzwords You’ll Encounter in B-School

After reading the list start noting the dumb phrases you hear or use. I dare you.
By the way, it’s probably a good idea not to point out to the boss how silly he or she sounds.

The Silliest Buzzwords You’ll Encounter in B-School

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Why Entrepreneurs Continue to Work

In his book, Man’s Search For Meaning, Victor Frankl wrote about the importance of purpose and a goal in one’s life. An Austrian psychiatrist, he wrote from the perspective of having survived the horrors of the Nazi concentration camps. His life in Auschwitz and his subsequent research confirmed that people who lose their sense of purpose could will themselves to die.
We all need a purpose, and for many entrepreneurs it is working at their business that provides that purpose. We need something to strive for, to stretch ourselves until the day we die; thus we extend our lives. All your life, you’ve been living with gaps that you’ve tried to close. The difference between what is and what you would like it to be. You’ve had mortgages and loans to pay off, properties to buy, places to go, new product lines to develop, new ways of doing business, new markets to pursue, and competitors to beat. If you suddenly stop, and there is no work, no creative tension in your life, you’re in danger of losing your sense of purpose and your will to live.
When I was growing up, my family farmed next to a neighbour who always seemed ancient to me. In his seventies, he still farmed with a team of horses, worked hard every day and, frankly, was stronger than me – even when I was a teenager. At 80 he was still wiry and strong, and worked as hard as any of us. But, at last he agreed with those who pushed him to sell the farm, move into town, and take it easy. Within 18 months he was dead. All his outdoor activity, his exercise, his routines, his love for his horses, and his sense of purpose were gone. Although those who insisted he move from the farm had the best of intentions, tragically the move became his death sentence.
Many entrepreneurs don’t plan to retire. While it may not be a conscious decision or clearly articulated, they fear losing their sense of purpose. They continue working in order to live a meaningful life. Others, who do retire, find purpose in volunteering, coaching young entrepreneurs, investing in start-ups, being active grandparents, travelling or other avocations.
You have the choice to work or not through your retirement years. One isn’t better than the other. But to be healthy, we all need a purpose. If you choose to transition your business and retire, you must first transition yourself and identify new challenges, opportunities, and purpose to replace your need to work.

http://www.tac-focus.com/focus-areas/succession-transition-planning

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Best Ways to Prepare for Your Summer Vacation


Regardless of whether your summer travel plans call for camping in the wild, whitewater rafting down a raging river or taking a road trip, one objective should be to disconnect from the hustle and bustle back home and really get away from it all.
If the very thought of unplugging from your workplace causes you to break out in a cold sweat, remember: Disconnection is key to full relaxation. Numerous scientific studies have shown that people who take vacations are less likely to suffer from depression and report higher levels of overall happiness than people who don’t.
The truth is, over time, our physical and mental health deteriorates if we don’t take time to decompress and slow down. This hampers our ability to be effective players at work and can cramp our personal lives as well. So start by thinking of your vacation as an investment in your well-being, then follow these ten tips on how to prepare to go on vacation.
1. Don’t leave important, must-get-done projects to the last minute. You risk not getting them finished and having them mentally weigh you down during your “off time” – or worse: working on them while you are supposed to be relaxing.
2. Select someone as your contact person who can address important issues and emergencies while you’re gone. Brief her/him – and your boss – about any potential issues that may arise.
3. If you are closing your office and everyone will be leaving, let your key clients know how long you will be away. Provide the names and contact information of people your clients can reach out to if they need a resource. Leave your cell number on your email away message or cell phone voice mail saying that you can be reached if (and I mean only if) there is an emergency. I have done this fo r the last ten years and, so far, no one has called.
4. Never officially come back on a Monday. Make your re-entry easier by officially starting on a Tuesday. Use Monday for catch-up and prepare a cheat sheet ahead of time with a reminder list of to-do’s to be completed immediately upon your return.
5. Once you have your work responsibilities covered, you can begin to get in the vacation frame of mind.Quietly ask yourself what you need to do to get the highest level of benefit from your vacation, and set realistic expectations for your time away. For example: It may take you a day or so to decompress. Don’t try to force the relaxation; instead, ease into it.
6. Facilitate your decompression by pampering yourself a bit ahead of time. Indulge in a pre-vacation massage, golf game or long lunch – anything that helps you get into relaxation mode.  Invest in a haircut, manicure, pedicure, etc. so that you can feel confident and spoiled.
7. If you’re taking a stay-at-home vacation, otherwise known as a “staycation”, keep the vacation mode alive and well by keeping yourself from over-planning activities. For example: Don’t make hard labor projects at home, like building a new kitchen, one of your staycation goals. Instead make your time at home unstructured. Watch that movie tha t’s been sitting by the TV for weeks, sit back and read a book, spend hours pursuing your hobby. Do what you always want to do but never seem to have time for.
8. One of the easiest things to do, yet one of the most often forgotten, is to arrange for someone to check your mail and pick up newspapers while you are away. This prevents would-be thieves from knowing you’re not home.
9. Pack smart by keeping the small details in mind, and make sure to take items that tend to be more expensive at vacation resorts, such as sunblock, toothpaste and aspirin. 
10. Save money by booking a suite:An extra-large hotel room might seem pricey, but it’s often the best deal for a big family. Ask about the availability of sleeper sofas and rollaways if you need additional beds. 
11. Recent research shows that, to be the most satisfying, leisure time should resemble the best aspects of work: challenges, skills and important relationships. Do some research and identify the types of activities you might want to do on your trip such as golfing, sailing, biking or hiking. What family fun is available? If you think vegging out is a vacation, you may be sh ortchanging yourself. Oftentimes, keeping your mind occupied will be easier than just trying to instantly tune out.
12.  Lastly, when on the actual vacation itself, be sure to avoid multitasking. Being on the beach while texting does not make for a true vacation. And please don’t rush throughyour plans. The idea is to enjoy your vacation in a leisurely ma nner and not race through it as if you were running a marathon. Instead, create a loose schedule whereby everyone gets to do what they want to do and ends up satisfied with the time off.
You need and deserve to tune out once in a while.  This prevents you from hitting a wall in your job when there is no break. Remember, when you look back at your life, it’s not going to be what you missed at work during your vacation you’ll think about – but the memories made from quality time away. On that note, upon your return, keep your memories alive by framing photos of your vacation.  Let the joy of your vacation be remembered in special places in your home and office.
Cheers
Roz

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Listen to my latest CD “How To Be Politically Savvy: Developing A Personal Brand For Success”                          

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Wayne Einhorn Interview on Business in Motion

Wayne Einhorn on Business in Motion

Wayne Einhorn is my guest on Business in Motion this week. Listen in to Business in Motion on radio station 93.3 CFMU. Fridays at 12 noon eastern time.

Wayne Einhorn, an internationally renowned speaker, senior executive, Implementation Engineer and board member has been involved in businesses at all levels for twenty seven years. Today he is a Managing Partner at EDI, an organization that drives implementation that improves cash flow and profit for hundreds of businesses around the world today.
In addition to earning his MBA at the top ranked Richard Ivey School of Business, Wayne is a founding partner of EDIImplementation Professionals Inc. EDI is an organization of implementation experts providing strategic solutions that transform enterprises, empowering them to identify and capitalize on business opportunities.
Today EDI has logged thousands of hours of successful client implementations – knowledge that Wayne will share with you today.

Along with his corporate responsibilities, Wayne loves spending time with his family which includes his wife and three teenage children. Wayne is a pilot, an outdoorsman and generously volunteers his time to several organizations. He has served on the Board of Directors at YOUTHLINK, – an organization committed to helping the growing number of street involved youth in Metropolitan Toronto and is currently on the board of STEPS a not for profit dedicated to assisting people whose lives have been affected by addiction to integrate back into society.

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What is Strategic Thinking?

This question was posed in a Linkedin group.


What is Strategic Thinking?


This was my reply. 


——————–
We only need a strategy when we want to change something. You don’t need a strategy to stay the same.

Strategic thinking must be the ability to clairify the pain that you are willing to experience for the uncertain outcome.

——————– 


What do you think?

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Interview Guest: LGeneral Andrew Leslie (Ret)

LGeneral Andrew Leslie (Ret)
LGeneral Adrew Leslie (Ret)

My guest on Business in Motion this week is LGeneral Andrew Leslie (Ret)
Listen at 12 noon Eastern Time to 93.3 FM in Hamilton, Ontario or on the web at 93.3 CFMU
Who is LGeneral Andrew Leslie (Ret)?
Battle tested on the plains of Afghanistan, the mountains of Croatia and the corridors of bureaucracy, General Leslie is the man who was chosen to prepare the Canadian military for the future. This critical and politically charged appointment came as a result of his outstanding career as an expert in risk management, strategic planning and, above all, leadership.
A fascinating speaker, General Leslie, the former Chief of the Canadian Army, delivers insight that links the universal lessons of leadership in battle to corporate leadership that has to initiate and lead change.
Also, his insider’s perspective of the process of transforming the armed forces is a powerful resource for any organization contemplating change to meet future challenges. Whether it is the challenge of evolving demand, the workforce of the future or the effects of globalization, Leslie’s lessons learned are invaluable.    
Born into a multi-generational military family that includes Generals and Ministers of Defense, Leslie is a graduate of the University of Ottawa and several European military schools, he holds degrees in economics and military history. He has served in several overseas postings including leading troops in the former Yugoslavia where he was tapped to be Deputy Commander of UN Confidence Restoration Operation in Croatia to lead the rebuilding of that country.
Then it was Afghanistan, where he was Deputy Commander of the International Security Assistance Force, following which he was appointed as head of the Canadian Army. Finally he was appointed to Chief of Transformation for the Canadian Forces, where it was his job to design the efficient transition of Canada’s Armed Forces to better prepare for future challenges.
He has received numerous awards, not the least of which is The Order of Military Merit, one of Canada’s highest awards. Foreign governments have also recognized Leslie’s contributions with the Commander’s Cross Order of Merit from Poland and from the US, the Commander of the US Legion of Merit. Leslie is the only non-American to receive this award to date.
General Leslie has since transformed himself to the civilian world where he heads up the Defence, Public Safety and Intelligence unit of CGI Group Inc. a Canadian company that is one of the largest independent information technology and business process services firms in the world.

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Ten Commandments of Poor Delegation

Respect your assistant’s time as well as your own. 

By Harold Taylor

Some managers fail to consider how their behavior impacts their staff member’s effectiveness on the job. Poor time management practices reverberate throughout the organization. If you are obeying these ten tongue-in-cheek commandments from an administrative assistant, you could be in trouble.

1. When you give me a time-sensitive assignment, leave it until the last minute. I love the adrenalin rush of an unrealistic deadline.

2. Interrupt me every few minutes to ask how a project is going. I hate the feeling of neglect that trust can produce.

3. When you leave the office, don’t tell me where you’re going or how long you’ll be gone. Not knowing stimulates my creativity when others ask.

4. Don’t share the company’s mission statement and goals with me. I love the challenge of prioritizing jobs without knowing how they relate to overall objectives.

5. Don’t put deadline dates on any assignments you give me to do. Not knowing their relative importance allows me to hone my psychic skills.

6. Give me things to do just before quitting time. I am always looking for excuses to work late.

7. If I do a good job, keep it a secret. If word gets out it could mean a raise or heaven forbid, a promotion. And I love everything just the way it is.
 
8. Search for minor errors in any documents that I create. (The ones that normal people would never notice.)   It doesn’t matter that they are simply for internal discussion purposes or not. Everyone appreciates a perfectionist. And constant criticism keeps me humble.

9. If I make an obvious mistake, be sure to criticize me in public. I’d hate to have my fellow workers think I’m perfect.

10. Keep interrupting me throughout the day with trivial chitchat. Those constant breaks in my concentration are stress relieving and keep me from finishing projects too quickly.

Your administrative assistant is the key to your success as a manager. But he/she is probably already the dumping ground for a myriad of tasks and victim of countless interruptions. The desperate salesperson fighting to get through to the boss, the harried employee looking for a copy of a misplaced memo, a courier dropping off a package and wanting a signature, the irate customer, convinced he had ordered something different than he received. Your assistant sits precariously in the line of firehe/she is probably already the dumping ground for a myriad of tasks and victim of countless interruptions. The desperate salesperson fighting to get through to the boss, the harried employee looking for a copy of a misplaced memo, a courier dropping off a package and wanting a signature, the irate customer, convinced he had ordered something different than he received. Your assistant sits precariously in the line of firehe/she is probably already the dumping ground for a myriad of tasks and victim of countless interruptions. The desperate salesperson fighting to get through to the boss, the harried employee looking for a copy of a misplaced memo, a courier dropping off a package and wanting a signature, the irate customer, convinced he had ordered something different than he received. Your assistant sits precariously in the line of fire

Don’t be a perfectionist. While it’s important that such things as client proposals be top quality, remember that by spending unnecessary time on a task, other high pay-off activities may be short-changed.

Communicate. The more your assistant knows, the more he or she will be able to help you. A knowledgeable assistant can save you hours each week by providing information to callers and visitors without having to disturb you. When you attend a conference or take a vacation, spend some time briefing your assistant on matters that are likely to occur during your absence.

Above all, set a good example and show respect for your assistant’s time. Plan your day. Accumulate the non-urgent requests to eliminate constant interruptions Keep a folder to house assignments of lesser importance for later review. Place realistic deadlines on all tasks that you assign. Respect your assistant’s time as well as your own.

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Busy, Busy, Busy – No Time to Plan, video with Harold Taylor

Watch this video of Harold Taylor pointing out the silly things that we do at work to waste our time and get us into trouble. The Three Stooges couldn’t have done a funnier yet revealing skit.

Harold Taylor will be a guest on Business in Motion on Friday June 1 at 12 noon Eastern time. Listen to the live broadcast on 93.3 FM in the Hamilton are or online at http://cfmu.msumcmaster.ca/

Harold is a time management expert, author and professional speaker. I’ve been using his Taylor Time Planner for over 20 years.

https://www.taylorintime.com/
Click here to Learn more about Taylor Time Consultants

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15 Biographies Every MBA Student Should Read

Every MBA has an opportunity to make an impact on the business world in their own way, but first, it sure doesn’t hurt to find out about the greatness of others. Reading about the lives and work of business icons from both the past and present can lend a great deal of insight for your own career. Check out these biographies to discover the entertaining and educational stories of 15 great men and women in business.
  1. The Snowball: Warren Buffett and the Business of Life

    What does it take to become one of the richest men in the world? Get some insight from The Snowball, the story of successful investor Warren Buffet. You’ll find insights into not just his strategies for business and investing, but his personal life as well. Certainly a good choice for any budding MBA in search of wisdom from one of the greatest men in business.
  2. My Years with General Motors

    Written by former GM CEO Alfred Sloan in 1963, My Years With General Motors has been regarded as a management classic for many years. So much so, that Business Week named it their top pick for their “bookshelf of indispensable reading.” Full of ideas for creative business management, Sloan’s biography is no less than a manual for managers. Read his story, and you’ll be able to better understand the basic concepts of the discipline of management, and how Sloan put these concepts to work to turn GM into the biggest company in the world after WWII.
  3. Steve Jobs

    It’s no wonder that Steve Jobs was Amazon’s best selling book of 2011: it’s an amazingly insightful look into one of the most talked about men in business. The late Jobs is legendary for his creativity, innovation, and being notoriously difficult to work with. Apple fans, business students, and those curious about Jobs’ life will be satisfied with this biography that delves deeply into his life.
  4. Call Me Ted

    Follow media tycoon Ted Turner’s story in this book, from dropping out of college to turning his father’s billboard company into an international media empire, and going on to become a champion in his personal interests of sailing and baseball as well. Written primarily by Turner himself, Call Me Ted also includes passages from those close to him, including family, colleagues, and competitors, all revealing how Turner has pushed through setbacks and learned how to achieve greatness in business and in life.
  5. The Autobiography of Andrew Carnegie

    The hard work and frustrations of business school may have you questioning what the point of all this is, and Andrew Carnegie’s autobiography might just answer that question. As a man who amassed a great fortune, Carnegie famously put his money to work as a philanthropist. This book explains how he created organizations that allowed him to give away more than $350 million in his own lifetime.

Read the rest of this post at 15 Biographies Every MBA Student Should Read

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Interview with George Torok about visit to Iran: On People in Connection TV

First visit to Iran in 2009 – TV interview on People in Connection TV with Host Marie Mushing

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Wanted: Young Business Leaders Halton/Hamilton/Niagara

Do you know of young business leaders in Halton, Hamilton or Niagara? The Business Link newspaper is searching for nominations for The Top 40 under Forty.


The Business Link will be honouring 40businesspeople under 40 years of age (as of March 1, 2012) who are making theirmark in the Greater Hamilton and Halton communities through business success, communityinvolvement and charitable work. 


Notice the combined requirement for business success plus community involvement and charity work.


I guess that means that hermit Internet millionaires need not apply.


You can find The Top 40 under Forty nomination form here.

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Interview with Seth Godin: We are all Weird

Listen to this audio interview with Seth Godin on the topic of Weird. If you are not yet weird, maybe you will be after listening to Seth Godin.

Success Mag interview, 2012 from Seth Godin on Vimeo.

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Curious George Visits Toronto – photo slide show

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Contrarian or Team Player – Which are You??

Why We Need Contrarians in The Workplace

This article by Barbara Moses published in the Globe and Mail suggests that contrarians are valuable additions to every workplace team – whether they are appreciated or not.

But is a contrarian really appreciated by a group of team players? Are the two labels polar opposites, or is one a different shade of the other?

I agree with the position of the article that the concept of being a team player has been over hyped. I think to the point of blind obedience.

In my experience good team players:

  • Go along with the rest of the group
  • Are unwilling to offend others
  • Do not place a high value on their own time
  • Are willing to sacrifice results for group harmony
  • Avoid embarrassment

In my experience contrarians:

  • See things differently
  • Ask bold and challenging questions
  • Are willing to take a postition
  • Are willing to oppose the group
  • Accept that they will make mistakes

  

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10 Tips to Make 2012 More Productive and Profitable

Kick off the new year by listening to George Torok’s “Top 10 Tips to Make Your 2012 a More Productive and Profitable Year“.

Listen to this 30 minute radio show with host, George Torok.
10-tips-to-make-2012-more-productive-profitable

Here is a summary of the tips.

10 Tips to Make 2012 a More Productive and Profitable Year

1. Fail Fast, Fail Often and Fail Cheap

Be willing to make, and learn from your mistakes. Treat mistakes as part of the growing process – not an end. Think ahead by limiting the cost of possible failures. This tip is courtesy of Jim Estill.

2. Be Clear on Your Purpose

Why are you doing this? Ask that question of yourself more often before you invest your time, money or effort. Clarify the purpose of each meeting, promotion or decision before you commit.

3. Fundamentals

Revisit the fundamentals. Technology changes rapidly. Techniques adapt to circumstances. But the fundamentals never change nor fail you. Don’t wing it, understand the fundamentals.

4. Stop Chasing Perfection

You will never be perfect. Chasing perfection will result in repeated frustration. Instead strive to be better every time. Then you can experience a chain of small wins and progressive successes.

5. Stop Doing Things

What do you need to stop doing to allow you to do more of what you really want to do? Write your “Stop doing list”. This is as important as your “To do list.”

6. Scare Yourself

Face at least one thing that scares you. That’s how you grow. Courage is not being without fear – it is facing your fear. You’ll discover more about yourself when you scare yourself.

7. Ask Better Questions

Ask better questions of yourself, others and the world around you. You’ll be amazed at the answers you’ll get. It takes more thought to ask good questions than to answer them.

8. Review and Use Your Resources

You have resources that you aren’t fully using. Check your tangible and especially intangible resources for new opportunities. You already have what you need to succeed. Check your pockets.

9. Visit Other Worlds

Life is best observed through a kaleidoscope. Discover other cultures, opinions and perspectives. Volunteer for a charity, read about history and listen to other views without judging. Walk around the block with your eyes open.

10. Accept the Mess in Your Head

You are the best person to deal with the mess in your head. That will include a mix of ideas, questions, unfinished thoughts, self doubts, fears, anxieties, hopes, dreams…

No one else will ever know about the mess in your head. And you can work to organize some of that mess.

Listen to the podcast of this radio show here.

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Best Interviews from 2011

It’s difficult to select the best because many of these radio interviews with business leaders are so good. Here is our selection for this year. Click the links to listen to the interviews. Enjoy. Be inspired.

Murray Hogarth, Founder Pioneer Gas Stations

 

Murray Hogarth launched the first Pioneer gas station in 1956. Today there are more than 150 Pioneer gas stations across Ontario.

 
  • Pioneer donates 1% of profits – not revenue to charity.
  • Murray Hogarth was instrumental in the formation of CAFE – the Canadian Association of Family Enterprises.
  • Pioneer is the largest independant gas station chain.
  • Murray Hogarth was voted the Entrepreneur of the Year by the Burlington Economic Development Corporation for 2010.

Listen to the radio interview with Murray Hogarth

 
 
Bruce McDougall, The McDougall Group

Who is Bruce McDougall?

He is the founder and president of The McDougall Group, a financial planning company in Burlington, Ontario. A past president of the Burlington Chamber of Commerce he is a long time active Rotarian. He is a marathon runner, tri-athlete, a past competitive racquetball player and an avid golfer.

Listen to the interview Bruce McDougall

Kathy Bardswick, The Co-Operators Group

Kathy Bardswick has been with the Co-Operators for 32 years. She worked her way through various roles with the company. A working mom with four children she was inspired by her own mother (with six children) who encouraged her to pursue her dreams. Kathy earned her MBA at McMaster University.

Listen to the interview with Kathy Bardswick

 
 

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Alan McLaren, Infinity Communications

Interview with Alan McLaren, Co-CEO of Infinity Communications
Who is Infinity Communications?

Infinity is a full service communications agency specializing in public relations, branding and social media strategies. We help our clients “Get Noticed and Stay Noticed”, through focused communication programs designed to build brand awareness and drive revenue growth.

One of the best ways to reach your target audiences is to use a combination of traditional public relations strategies offline, while leveraging social media and web strategies online.

We are living in a connected world and it is important to bridge the conversation both online and offline.

———————————————
Insights and excerpts from this interview with Alan McLaren of Infinity Communications

Purpose of marketing is building the brand to be top of mind.

Common mistake on the web is not connecting the dots.

Key question is, does more traffic mean more business? That is the bottom line.

Marketing is not scientific. One plus one does not equal two.

Half the time, we turn prospective clients away because the fit is not right.

Red Flag Deals was one of our proud success stories.

I hate doing the numbers – but you need to do that.
As Co-CEOs we each have our strengths and defined roles.

Interview on Business in Motion with radio show host George Torok

Listen to the radio interview on podscast

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Motivational Chicken and Egg

You know the old conundrum, “What came first, the chicken or the egg?”
One leads to other and one can exist without the other.

Well a similar conundrum exists when it comes to motivation. The question is, “What comes first the motivation or the motion?” Motivation and motion are closely related and interdependent. The words come from the same root. Certainly motivation leads to motion and motion builds motivation.

What comes first? It doesn’t really matter. When you feel motivated you will move into action – motion. When you are in motion already you will feel motivated – motivation. So if you don’t feel motivated – move. Do something. Start something. Get yourself into motion and you will start to feel more motivated. Doing things motivates. Resting seldom motivates you. Yes everyone needs a break but “break” is relative and a good break can just be a change.

When you want to feel motivated – move. Put yourself into motion. You might be surprised at how motivated you feel. We feel most motivated just after we have completed a tremendous task. Right after I finish a marathon I feel like I can run another (not right away of course).

So when you need some motivation – move. Try your happy dance.

© George Torok is a Canadian motivational speaker who specializes in helping business owners and professionals deliver their messages for better results. Visit his website www.Torok.com

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Who’s Responsible for Your Success?

The 10 Reasons Why You Don’t Sell as Much as You Could (or Should) and What To Do About It by Jim DomanskiBe real honest with yourself: are you selling as much as you could … or as much as you should? If you have that vague and uneasy feeling that ma…

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P T Barnum – Showman

Phineas Taylor Barnum (July 5, 1810 – April 7, 1891) was an American showman, businessman, scam artist and entertainer, remembered for promoting celebrated hoaxes and for founding the circus that became the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circ…

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Fail Often, Fail Fast, Fail Cheap

That’s powerful advice from Jim Estill. He is a successful entrepreneur who build his business from nothing to annual revenue of over $300 million. He then sold the business – like a smart entrepreneur.

I have shared the stage with Jim as presenters and expert panelists. Jim has much wisdom to offer. Of all the advice I’ve gathered from him this one resonates with me the most.

“Fail often, fail fast, fail cheap.” – Jim Estill

Just imagine how “the fear of failing” can halt success. Instead, Jim suggests that we accept failures as necessary to growth.

Jim Estill discusses each point in more detail in this article.

For Better Innovation – Fail Often, Fail Fast, Fail Cheap
by Jim Estill

Companies need to be encouraging of failure. Too often people are disciplined for trying things that do not work. I advocate the opposite. Praise those who try – even if they fail.

Read the rest of this article at For Better Innovation – Fail Often, Fail Fast, Fail Cheap

This line in the article particulaily jumped out at me.

“Having failures does not make you a failure. Not trying makes you a failure.”

George Torok

Host of Business in Motion

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Speaking About Marketing In Iran – TV interview

George Torok is interviewed on People in Connection TV about his speaking tour in Iran.

He spoke about the Secrets of Power Marketing to business audiences in five cities.

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Fools & Experts on Creative Problem Solving Team

Why do you need both fools and experts on your creative problem solving team?What are their strengths and roles that help you solve problems?In this video George Torok explains the answers to those questions.George Torok – Creativity CatalystCreative F…

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20 Classic Case Studies Every Business Student Should Know

Enjoy this collection of 20 important business lessons illustrated with case studies.

Here are two that I particularily enjoyed reading.

David vs. Goliath

It’s tough to be the little guy, especially when one of the big guys becomes your direct competition. But at Hangers Cleaners, an offbeat image and good customer service helped them pull through when P&G opened an eco-friendly dry cleaners in the same town. Hangers differentiated itself through van delivery service, funny t-shirts and hangers, as well as social networking. The company also spent time connecting with the community by partnering with local businesses and charities.

Instead of out-pricing or out-spending P&G, Hangers embraced its personality and adopted a culture of excellent service that customers found value in. As a result, Hangers has experienced growth while other local dry cleaners have reported flat or declining revenues.

Triumph in Niche Exports

Another excellent international case study comes from bike manufacturer Triumph, which lost steam in its British home base three decades ago, but found new life by heading overseas. In 2010, Triumph sold just 7,562 bikes in the UK, but 50,000 worldwide, indicating that an international interest paid off for the company. Triumph’s famous factory in Warwickshire closed up shop in 1983, but the Indian factory remained, and these days, the motorcycles have become the country’s Harley Davidson.

The company struggles to meet demand in India, with a six month waiting list and a new factory being built. India’s middle class has embraced the vehicle as an affordable commodity, even giving them as dowries in weddings.

Read the rest of these lessons here.

20 Classic Case Studies Every Business Student Should Know

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The forever recession (and the coming revolution)

From Seth Godin

There are actually two recessions:

The first is the cyclical one, the one that inevitably comes and then inevitably goes. There’s plenty of evidence that intervention can shorten it, and also indications that overdoing a response to it is a waste or even harmful.

The other recession, though, the one with the loss of “good factory jobs” and systemic unemployment–I fear that this recession is here forever.

Why do we believe that jobs where we are paid really good money to do work that can be systemized, written in a manual and/or exported are going to come back ever? The internet has squeezed inefficiencies out of many systems, and the ability to move work around, coordinate activity and digitize data all combine to eliminate a wide swath of the jobs the industrial age created.

There’s a race to the bottom, one where communities fight to suspend labor and environmental rules in order to become the world’s cheapest supplier. The problem with the race to the bottom is that you might win…

Factories were at the center of the industrial age. Buildings where workers came together to efficiently craft cars, pottery, insurance policies and organ transplants–these are job-centric activities, places where local inefficiences are trumped by the gains from mass production and interchangeable parts. If local labor costs the industrialist more, he has to pay it, because what choice does he have?

No longer. If it can be systemized, it will be. If the pressured middleman can find a cheaper source, she will. If the unaffiliated consumer can save a nickel by clicking over here or over there, then that’s what’s going to happen.

It was the inefficiency caused by geography that permitted local workers to earn a better wage, and it was the inefficiency of imperfect communication that allowed companies to charge higher prices.

The industrial age, the one that started with the industrial revolution, is fading away. It is no longer the growth engine of the economy and it seems absurd to imagine that great pay for replaceable work is on the horizon.

This represents a significant discontinuity, a life-changing disappointment for hard-working people who are hoping for stability but are unlikely to get it. It’s a recession, the recession of a hundred years of the growth of the industrial complex.

I’m not a pessimist, though, because the new revolution, the revolution of connection, creates all sorts of new productivity and new opportunities. Not for repetitive factory work, though, not for the sort of thing ADP measures. Most of the wealth created by this revolution doesn’t look like a job, not a full time one anyway.

When everyone has a laptop and connection to the world, then everyone owns a factory. Instead of coming together physically, we have the ability to come together virtually, to earn attention, to connect labor and resources, to deliver value.

Stressful? Of course it is. No one is trained in how to do this, in how to initiate, to visualize, to solve interesting problems and then deliver. Some see the new work as a hodgepodge of little projects, a pale imitation of a ‘real’ job. Others realize that this is a platform for a kind of art, a far more level playing field in which owning a factory isn’t a birthright for a tiny minority but something that hundreds of millions of people have the chance to do.

Gears are going to be shifted regardless. In one direction is lowered expectations and plenty of burger flipping. In the other is a race to the top, in which individuals who are awaiting instructions begin to give them instead.

The future feels a lot more like marketing–it’s impromptu, it’s based on innovation and inspiration, and it involves connections between and among people–and a lot less like factory work, in which you do what you did yesterday, but faster and cheaper.

This means we may need to change our expecations, change our training and change how we engage with the future. Still, it’s better than fighting for a status quo that is no longer. The good news is clear: every forever recession is followed by a lifetime of growth from the next thing…
Job creation is a false idol. The future is about gigs and assets and art and an ever-shifting series of partnerships and projects. It will change the fabric of our society along the way. No one is demanding that we like the change, but the sooner we see it and set out to become an irreplaceable linchpin, the faster the pain will fade, as we get down to the work that needs to be (and now can be) done.

This revolution is at least as big as the last one, and the last one changed everything.


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Business in Motion
Weekly radio show
Host: George Torok
www.BusinessinMotion.ca

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Kathy Bardswick, The Co-Operators Group radio interivew

Radio interview with Kathy Kathy Bardswick

Radio interview with Kathy Bardswick, President and CEO of the Co-Operators Group.
Kathy Bardswick has been with the Co-Operators for 32 years. She worked her way through various roles with the company. A working mom with four children she was inspired by her own mother (with six children) who encouraged her to pursue her dreams. Kathy earned her MBA at McMaster University.
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Inisghts from this interview with Kathy Bardswick

The Co-Operators is a co-operative that is owned by 47 other like-minded co-operatives.
Each owner owns an equal share. The share value does not change which means that the company does not focus on driving share value.

They are in the business of offering financial security for Canadians along with peace of mind for the ups and downs of life.

Co-operators was formed to meet unmet needs in 1945 by Saskachewan farmers who were unable to buy insurance from the traditional insurers.

It is run democratically in that everyone has a voice – yet people are held accountable.
A big concern and worry is the sustainability of our world environment and the quality of life.

The increasing gap between rich and poor does not bode well.

Youth Sustainability Conference – an opportunity for students to leverage their passion for sustainability.

We have reduced our internal footprint by 22%. The next goal is 50% and the step after that is to be carbon neutral.
entrepreneur to separate the two.

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Host: George Torok
www.BusinessinMotion.ca

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Tips for Getting Your Start-Up Going

By Cynthia KocialskiEntrepreneurs suddenly have an idea and then they just want to get going building the product and starting the new business. All entrepreneurs are impatient people. It’s hard to pull on the reins and get them to stop and investiga…

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Recruit Both Fools and Experts to Your Creative Problem Solving Team

You need both fools and experts on your creative problem solving team. They bring different and essential strengths to your team.

But they are needed for different purposes. You will get the most from them if you understand their strengths and use them accordingly.

Fools on your creative problem solving team

Fools are good at asking questions

Fools help you discover options

Fools are best at stepping into new paradigms

Fools are fond of breaking rules

Fools are helpful in defining strategy

Fools are effective

Fools are best at divergent thinking

Fools help you zoom out to see the big picture

Experts on your creative problem solving team

Experts are best at answering questions

Experts help you focus

Experts are best at maintaining the status quo

Experts are fond of following procedures

Experts are dependable with tactics

Experts are efficient

Experts are best at convergent thinking
Experts help you zoom in on the details

When you form your creative problem solving teams, be sure to include both fools and experts. Both groups play critical parts in the creative problem solving process. It’s not about being right or wrong. It’s about finding and implementing the best solutions to the challenges you face.

George Torok

Creative Facilitator

Creative Problem Solving seminars

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Host: George Torok
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Can You Be a Health Coach?

You are invited to attend a Health Coach webinar event (60-minutes) that will demonstrate how to earn an income as a Professional Health Coach usingweb based systems for coaching. This complimentary presentation is hosted by Hilton Johnson Productions, the people who have pioneered professional Health Coaching with web-based technology.http://www.globalteleclass.com/specialhc240b

Companies like Google, Motorola and UnitedHealthCare are employing web- based health coaches everyday to address the problems of healthcare directly.

Because of the demand, there is a shortage of good qualified health coaches. Could this be the next billion dollar business?

Health coaching is changing healthcare because it helps people not to get sick in the first place. Web-based coaching allows almost anyone to quickly build a professional coaching practice/income and deliver excellent coaching.

This teleconference call/webinar will show you exactly how. You can be a successful health coach without any selling, prospecting, or using any persuasive techniques. This call will take place on: Wednesday, July 13th at 2:00 PM ET (New York Time) To attend this complimentary training session click on the link below or copy and paste it into your web-browser. (You will need to be on your phone and the Internet to attend this event.)http://www.globalteleclass.com/specialhc240b

The concept makes sense to me. I would rather avoid those colds then suffer through.

George Torok

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Business in Motion
Weekly radio show
Host: George Torok
www.BusinessinMotion.ca

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