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PEI Government Continues to Ignore Business Community / Announces Another Significant Minimum Wage Increase

PEI Government Continues to Ignore Business Community / Announces Another Significant Minimum Wage Increase
PrintOctober 29, 2018On October 26, 2018, the government of Prince Edward Island announced that PEI businesses will be subject to an increase in…

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Manitoba Accessibility Standard For Customer Service Comes Into Effect Nov 1

Manitoba Accessibility Standard For Customer Service Comes Into Effect Nov 1
PrintOctober 22, 2018A reminder that Manitoba’s Accessibly Standard for Customer Service becomes a legal requirement for all Manitoba businesses as of November 1, 2018.
The Cu…

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Relief for Retail – Fixing Bill 148

Relief for Retail – Fixing Bill 148
PrintOctober 23, 2018The new Making Ontario Open for Business Act was tabled in the Ontario legislature this afternoon, which seeks to remove significant burdens that prevent Ontario businesses from creating jobs.
Th…

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The Cannabis ‘Cheat Sheet’: What is legal and where

The Cannabis ‘Cheat Sheet’: What is legal and where

Print

October 15, 2018

Most members will be aware that recreational cannabis will be legal across Canada as of Wednesday, October 17th.  While many rules are still in development, we thought it helpful to provide you with a snapshot view for each province and territory as they currently stand. RCC will continue to engage with provincial and territorial governments across the country as they refine regulations post-legalization, and will ultimately develop a guidebook on cannabis.  

Note that there is further regulation required from the federal government on edibles, which is expected in 2019. Until this time, edible marijuana products are not legalized. Once regulation on edibles is available, provinces will have the opportunity to pass their own legislation on edibles to complement federal rules. The federal government has indicated that edible products and concentrates will be authorized no later than October 2019, one year after the Cannabis Act comes into force.

Medical marijuana production, sale and use will continue to be regulated solely by the federal government; recreational legalization will not impact current laws for medical marijuana, but may impact unlicensed dispensaries, that will either be forced to shut down or required to go through a licensing process as recreational marijuana distributors.

If you have any questions or concerns, please don’t hesitate to contact: Karl Littler, Senior Vice President, Public Affairs at: klittler@retailcouncil.org or 416-467-3783

Province/Territory

Minimum age for purchase and possession

Where to purchase

Prohibited spaces

Cannabis in the workplace

For more information

Alberta

18+

Privately-run retail stores, government-operated online sales

Wherever tobacco use is prohibited

  • Hospital, school or child care facilities
  • Playgrounds, sports fields, skateboard or bike parks, zoos, outdoor theatres and pools and splash pads
  • In vehicles (except those used as temporary residences such as RVs)
  • Under existing Occupation Health and Safety legislation, the employer has an obligation to protect the health and safety of all workers on their work site. In turn, workers must safeguard their health and safety, and the health and safety of others around them.
  • Alberta has indicated the possibility of additional or updated legislation, training or education programs on cannabis in the workplace post-legalization.

Government of Alberta: Cannabis legalization in Alberta

British Columbia

19+

All supply and distribution managed by BC Liquor Distribution Branch to private and government retail stores. Government run online sales. 

Wherever tobacco use is prohibited

  • Playgrounds, sports fields, skate parks, and other places where children commonly gather;
  • School properties
  • Motor vehicles

 

  • Workplace impairment is currently prohibited under the Occupational Health and Safety Regulation. B.C. employers are encouraged to develop clear impairment policies that take a fitness-to-work test approach to workplace impairment.
  • WorkSafe BC has developed a primer on preparing for cannabis legalization in the workforce.

Government cannabis information site

BC Liquor Distribution Branch cannabis update page

 

Manitoba

19+

All supply and distribution managed by the provincial government. Privately run retail stores and online sales.

Cannabis use is prohibited in public spaces, including: restaurant patios, in stadiums or outdoor entertainment venues, near wading pools, splash pads and water parks, near playgrounds, on beaches, or within bus shacks or similar public structures.

  • Under the Workplace Safety and Health Act, employers must take necessary precautions to ensure the safety, health and welfare of workers, and to provide and maintain a safe workplace.
  • SafeWork Manitoba has developed a primer on impairment in the workplace

Manitoba Cannabis Retail Framework

New Brunswick

19+

Government operated retail stores, government operated online sales

Recreational cannabis use is prohibited in public spaces.

  • Under the Workplace Health and Safety Act, employers shall take every reasonable precaution to ensure the health and safety of employees, and employees must act so they do not endanger themselves or other people in the workplace.

New Brunswick: Legislation concerning cannabis control and drug-impaired driving

Newfoundland

19+

Privately run retail stores, government operated online sales, with prices for all cannabis set by government.

Recreational cannabis use is prohibited in public spaces.

  • Under the Occupational Health and Safety Regulations, an employer, supervisor or worker shall not enter or remain on the premises of a workplace or at a job site while his or her ability to perform work responsibilities is impaired by intoxicating substances or another cause that endangers his or her health or safety or that of other workers.

Government of Newfoundland and Labrador: Provincial Government Releases First Details on Cannabis Legalization in Newfoundland and Labrador

Nova Scotia

19+

Government operated retail stores (inside current liquor stores) and online sales

Wherever tobacco use is prohibited, as well as:

  • on or within 20 meters of playgrounds located in an outdoor public space
  • on or within 20 meters of a publicly owned sport and recreation event or venue, located in an outdoor public space
  • on and within nine meters of public trails
  • in provincial parks and on provincial beaches, except for within the boundaries of a rented campsite
  • in vehicles used as part of one’s job or work; this does not apply to a personal vehicle used for work purposes if they are the only person using the vehicle for work purposes (this applies to tobacco only – any use of cannabis in vehicles is prohibited).
  • Under the Occupational Health and Safety Act, employers are responsible for ensuring the health and safety of everyone at or near the workplace.
  • A primer on cannabis impairment in the workplace is available here.

Nova Scotia: Be in the know about legal cannabis in Nova Scotia

Ontario

19+

Following their defeat of the Liberals in the June election, the P.C. government introduced a new framework governing the sale and use of cannabis. The Ontario Cannabis Store website will be the only legal option for purchasing recreational cannabis as of October 17, 2018; there will be no retail stores. The government plans to introduce legislation that, if passed, would allow for private retail stores by April 2019

Wherever tobacco use is prohibited.

All methods of consuming cannabis would be prohibited in vehicles and boats that are being driven or under a person’s care or control, subject to certain exceptions that would be prescribed by regulation – e.g. use of medical cannabis edibles by a passenger who is a medical cannabis user.

Ontario Government: Cannabis legalization

Prince Edward Island

19+

Government run retail stores and online sales

Recreational cannabis use is prohibited in public spaces.

Under the Occupational Health and Safety Act, an employer shall ensure that every reasonable precaution is taken to protect the occupational health and safety of persons at or near the workplace

Government of Prince Edward Island: Province announces framework for cannabis legalization

Quebec

18+ (CAQ has indicated their intention to raise this to 21)

Government run retail stores and online sales

The recently elected CAQ has announced its intention to ban cannabis use in all public spaces.

Under the Act Respecting Occupational Health and Safety, every employer must take the necessary measures to protect the health and ensure the safety and physical well-being of his worker

Government of Québec: Regulating cannabis in Québec

Saskatchewan

19+

Privately run retail stores, online sales

Recreational cannabis use is prohibited in public spaces.

  • Under the Occupational Health and Safety Act, every employer shall ensure, insofar as is reasonably practicable, the health, safety and welfare at work of all of the employer’s workers
  • The Government of Saskatchewan is considering legislative changes to The Saskatchewan Employment Act and The Occupational Health and Safety Regulations, 1996 to more specifically include cannabis.

Government of Saskatchewan: Saskatchewan’s Cannabis Framework

Northwest Territories

19+

Initially through government liquor stores (retail and mail-order) possibility of cannabis-only stores in the future

Wherever tobacco use is prohibited, as well as in crowded places and parks frequented by children.

Under the Occupational Health and Safety Regulations, as effective September 12, 2018, no worker shall enter or remain in a work site if they are impaired, and no employer shall permit them to do so.

Government of NWT: Cannabis Legalization and Regulation Implementation Act

Nunavut

19+

Initially through government run online sales, with possibility to license government and/or private retail in the future

Wherever tobacco use is prohibited, as well as school grounds and other areas frequented by children

Under the Occupational Health and Safety Regulations, as effective September 12, 2018, no worker shall enter or remain in a work site if they are impaired, and no employer shall permit them to do so.

Nunavut: Cannabis

Yukon

19+

Initially, public retail stores and online sales only, run by the Yukon Liquor Corporation.

Preparing for private retail stores post-legalization.

Recreational cannabis use is prohibited in public spaces.

Under the Occupation Health and Safety Regulations, workers shall not enter, remain or be permitted to remain in a workplace while their ability to work may be affected by alcohol, drugs or other substances so as to endanger their health or safety or that of any other person.

Yukon Liquor Corporation’s recreational cannabis information

 

 

 

 

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For members with stores in Manitoba: Manitoba Says NO to Carbon Tax – Also Cancels Planned Basic Personal Tax Exemption Increase

For members with stores in Manitoba: Manitoba Says NO to Carbon Tax – Also Cancels Planned Basic Personal Tax Exemption Increase
PrintOctober 4, 2018• In a surprise announcement yesterday, Manitoba Premier Brian Pallister announced that the government …

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PEI Ban on Single Use Plastic Bags – What RCC Members Need to Know

PEI Ban on Single Use Plastic Bags – What RCC Members Need to Know
PrintOctober 11, 2018Please see the note below from the government of PEI dealing with next year’s ban on single use plastic bags and the fee on paper and reusable bags.
The government …

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Tracking Test

Tracking Test

Print

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For members with stores in British Columbia: BC Government to require registration of employers and recruiters of Temporary Foreign Workers

For members with stores in British Columbia: BC Government to require registration of employers and recruiters of Temporary Foreign Workers
PrintSeptember 25, 2018The BC Government will introduce legislation in fall 2018 to require that Employers and R…

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Scrap it and start over! RCC’s advice to the Ford Government to repeal Fair Workplaces, Better Jobs Act (Bill 148, 2017)

Scrap it and start over! RCC’s advice to the Ford Government to repeal Fair Workplaces, Better Jobs Act (Bill 148, 2017)

Print

September 25, 2018

RCC is calling on the Ford Government to repeal Bill 148 and then proceed to address individual problems where necessary. This was the very advice that Retail Council of Canada provided, on behalf of its retailers, to the Changing Workplaces Review Panel in 2015 and again in 2016. Bottom line, our position from the get-go was never to support these changes!

Retail Council of Canada (RCC) Calling for Repeal of Ontario Bill 148
RE: Amendments to Employment Standards Act (ESA) and the Labour Relations Act (LRA)

RCC is calling on the Ford Government to repeal Bill 148 and then proceed to address individual problems where necessary. This was the very advice that Retail Council of Canada provided, on behalf of its retailers, to the Changing Workplaces Review Panel in 2015 and again in 2016. Bottom line, our position from the get-go was never to support these changes!

Retailers told us that the changes to Ontario labour laws were ill-conceived and poorly drafted. In a nutshell, RCC and its members believe that many of Bill 148’s changes were harmful to business and to employment prospects for Ontarians. 

Rather than attempting to solve these many problems piece-by-piece, RCC believes that the best course of action would be to repeal Bill 148. Scrap it and start over!

Among the many issues affecting employment, Bill 148’s single biggest cost to businesses is, of course, the increase in minimum wage, which was raised 20.7% on January 1, 2018. With a further rise to $15/hour legislated for January 1, 2019, this would bring the increase to a whopping 29.3% over a 12-month period. 

RCC applauds the new Ontario government’s commitment to avert the increase to $15/hour on January 1, 2019.

Read RCC’s letter to the Ontario Minister of Labour CALLING FOR THE REPEAL OF BILL 148.

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Cannibas in Retail Forum Presentations

Cannibas in Retail Forum Presentations
Print

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Canada Post 2018 Holiday Success Guide

Date: Sep 11, 2018 

Prepare for the lucrative holiday selling season. Get ahead of developing trends with exclusive research.  Find practical tips for managing peak season and improving customer satisfaction.

Download the guide

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For members with stores in British Columbia: Food and beverages labelled as “organic” must be certified as of September 1, 2018

For members with stores in British Columbia: Food and beverages labelled as “organic” must be certified as of September 1, 2018
PrintAugust 3, 2018The BC Ministry of Agriculture’s food and beverage regulations will change on September 1, 2018 to requir…

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For members with stores in British Columbia: WorkSafeBC consults on regulatory amendment regarding Mobile Equipment

For members with stores in British Columbia: WorkSafeBC consults on regulatory amendment regarding Mobile Equipment
PrintAugust 1, 2018WorkSafeBC is consulting employers on changes to Part 16, Mobile Equipment, in the Occupational Health and Safety Reg…

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For members with stores in New Brunswick: WorkSafeNB System is Broken – Needs to Be Fixed Immediately

For members with stores in New Brunswick: WorkSafeNB System is Broken – Needs to Be Fixed Immediately
PrintAugust 1, 2018After an average increase of 53 percent in employer premiums between 2016-2018, WorkSafeNB announced that even the most conservativ…

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Ontario Introduces Pay Transparency Legislation

Ontario Introduces Pay Transparency Legislation
PrintMay 14, 2018Ontario recently passed legislation to increase transparency in the hiring process.
Starting on January 1, 2019, Ontario will:

Require all publicly advertised job postings to include a…

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Retail West Conference 2018

Date: Nov 6, 2018Retail West is Western Canada’s premier retail industry event, attended by over 300 mid – senior level executives. The event brings together retailers ranging in size from independent merchants to Canada’s largest retailers operat…

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Reducing the Distribution of Single-use Shopping Bags: A Resource Guide for BC Retailers

Reducing the Distribution of Single-use Shopping Bags: A Resource Guide for BC Retailers
PrintMarch 26, 2018 Canadians use somewhere between nine billion and 15 billion plastic bags every year, enough to circle the Earth more than 55 times if tied toge…

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Building loyalty among online shoppers

Date: May 30, 2018Webinar Start Time: 1:00pmWebinar End Time: 2:00pm 
About the Webinar: 
Loyal customers are the lifeblood of any successful e-commerce enterprise. Research shows shoppers who are loyal to a brand spend more money and make more fr…

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Loss Prevention Conference 2018

Date: Sep 20, 2018RCC LP 2018 is Canada’s leading retail loss prevention conference designed by retailers, for retailers. Top LP trends including identity theft, ORC, cyber and digital crime will be front and centre, as the industry’s thought lead…

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Canada Post Grow Workshops 2018

Date: May 1, 2018 to Oct 31, 2018

Effectively operate, grow and scale your e-commerce business
GROW 2018, a Canada-wide workshop series designed especially for small and medium-sized businesses, is coming to a city near you. If you are looking …

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PEI Produces Second Consecutive Balanced Budget – Increases Spending – Modest Tax Relief

PEI Produces Second Consecutive Balanced Budget – Increases Spending – Modest Tax Relief
PrintApril 12, 2018Last week, the Prince Edward Island (PEI) government tabled its second consecutive balanced budget. The budget featured a 5.7% increase in spend…

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CGP_finalists_2018

http://www.rccgrandprix.ca/content/finalists

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6 New Municipal Bylaws on Shopping Bags in the Montréal Metropolitan Community

6 New Municipal Bylaws on Shopping Bags in the Montréal Metropolitan Community
PrintApril 5, 2018Over the course of the past 3 weeks, the municipalities of Beloeil, Saint-Mathieu-de-Beloeil, Longueuil, Mascouche, Sainte-Marthe-sur-le-Lac and Beauharnoi…

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Members with Ontario Stores should be prepared for Ministry of Labour Enforcement Blitzes starting in June

Members with Ontario Stores should be prepared for Ministry of Labour Enforcement Blitzes starting in June
PrintApril 5, 2018The Ontario Ministry of Labour has released its enforcement blitz campaign as the following:
Business Type
Program

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For members with stores in Vancouver: City of Vancouver releases draft Single-Use Item Reduction Strategy

For members with stores in Vancouver: City of Vancouver releases draft Single-Use Item Reduction Strategy
PrintApril 2, 2018RCC has spent a significant amount of time and effort working with the City of Vancouver, Recycle BC and members to achieve the …

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Stand Pat Budget For Newfoundland and Labrador: Huge Financial Concerns Remain

Stand Pat Budget For Newfoundland and Labrador: Huge Financial Concerns Remain
PrintMarch 29, 2018The 2018-19 Newfoundland and Labrador budget has no plan of action to deal with the province’s huge deficit and staggering debt. Newfoundland and Labrador…

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2018-2019 Québec Government Budget: One Last Lap Before The Elections

2018-2019 Québec Government Budget: One Last Lap Before The Elections
PrintMarch 28, 2018The Québec Government tabled yesterday its last budget before the fixed date election scheduled for October 1st. Most personal income tax measures having already b…

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For members with stores in Saskatchewan: Beverage Handling Fees to Increase Easter Sunday – Surprise!

For members with stores in Saskatchewan: Beverage Handling Fees to Increase Easter Sunday – Surprise!
PrintMarch 26, 2018Without consultation and without notice, the Province of Saskatchewan announced on Friday, March 23, 2018 that Environmental Handli…

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For members with stores in Alberta: Alberta Forecasts Oil Dependent Balanced Budget and $96 Billion Debt by 2023

For members with stores in Alberta: Alberta Forecasts Oil Dependent Balanced Budget and $96 Billion Debt by 2023
PrintMarch 23, 2018On March 22 Alberta Finance Minister Joe Ceci tabled what is likely the Government’s last full budget before the spring…

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Amendment – Québec Parental Insurance Plan

Amendment – Québec Parental Insurance Plan
PrintMarch 23, 2018On March 22, 2018, Minister François Blais (Employment and Social Solidarity) introduced Bill 174: An Act mainly to relax the parental insurance plan to promote better family-work balance.
T…

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Atlantic Provinces – Changes to Employment Standards – Leave from Work

Atlantic Provinces – Changes to Employment Standards – Leave from Work
PrintMarch 23, 2018Since 2016, the federal government has been enacting changes to compassionate care and parental benefits. These changes allow workers to access employment insuran…

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Atlantic Provinces – Changes to Employment Standards – Leave from Work

Atlantic Provinces – Changes to Employment Standards – Leave from Work
PrintMarch 23, 2018Since 2016, the federal government has been enacting changes to compassionate care and parental benefits. These changes allow workers to access employment insuran…

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Quebec – Act to amend the Act respecting labour standards

Quebec – Act to amend the Act respecting labour standards
PrintMarch 21, 2018On March 20, 2018, Labour Minister Dominique Vien introduced Bill 176: An Act to amend the Act respecting labour standards and other legislative provisions mainly to facilitat…

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For members with stores in British Columbia: Labour Relations Code review submission urges restraint

For members with stores in British Columbia: Labour Relations Code review submission urges restraint
PrintMarch 20, 2018RCC has provided a joint submission to the B.C. Labour Relations Code review panel along with 12 other business associations.

The…

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For members with stores in Manitoba: Manitoba Introduces Climate and Implementation Act & PST Reduction Strategy

For members with stores in Manitoba: Manitoba Introduces Climate and Implementation Act & PST Reduction Strategy
PrintMarch 19, 2018On March 15, 2018 Manitoba Sustainable Development Minister Rochelle Squires introduced Bill 16, the Climate and Gr…

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Metro Vancouver landfill ban on white expanded polystyrene (Styrofoam™)

Metro Vancouver landfill ban on white expanded polystyrene (Styrofoam™)
PrintMarch 16, 2018Metro Vancouver is instituting a landfill ban effective July 1, 2018 on white expanded polystyrene.  The ban excludes:
• food and beverage containers and packin…

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Manitoba Budget Includes Carbon Tax, Personal and Business Tax Reductions

Manitoba Budget Includes Carbon Tax, Personal and Business Tax Reductions
PrintMarch 14, 2018Manitoba Finance Minister Cameron Friesen introduced the Government’s 2018 budget on March 12, 2018, presenting modest personal and business tax reductions, as…

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Amendments to Energy Efficiency Standards Regulation for select manufactured products

Amendments to Energy Efficiency Standards Regulation for select manufactured products
PrintMarch 15, 2018British Columbia announced changes to the Energy Efficiency Standards Regulation (EESR) under the Energy Efficiency Act, including new and updated…

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MS_HR Trends Survey

https://www.retailcouncil.org/retail-human-resources-trends-for-2018

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Federal Court Rules Against Oceanex / Status Quo For Marine Atlantic Subsidy

Federal Court Rules Against Oceanex / Status Quo For Marine Atlantic Subsidy
PrintMarch 9, 2018In late 2017, Oceanex (container shipping business) had a hearing before the Federal Court of Canada where it asked for a ruling that the federal Transport M…

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Terminology

Terminology
Print

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Flyer Distribution Standards

Flyer Distribution Standards
PrintRepresenting a billion-dollar industry, the Flyer Distribution Standards Association addressed issues shared by retailers, distributors, printers, binderies, transport companies, and media agencies. The mission was to…

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Federal Budget 2018

Federal Budget 2018
PrintFebruary 28, 2018The February 27 Federal budget did not contain any measures specific to retail but does include a number of items that may be of interest to RCC members.
The budget has been characterized as a social policy bud…

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RCR_Outlook2018

https://www.retailcouncil.org/research/retailconditions

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For members with stores in British Columbia: WorkSafeBC Expedited Review Consultation

For members with stores in British Columbia: WorkSafeBC Expedited Review Consultation
PrintFebruary 23, 2018RCC learned today that Paul Petrie who was contracted by the Chair of WorkSafeBC to conduct an expedited policy review is receiving submissions …

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Maritime Governments to Increase Minimum Wage on April 1st – RCC Push for CPI Adjustments

Maritime Governments to Increase Minimum Wage on April 1st – RCC Push for CPI Adjustments
PrintFebruary 13, 2018The government of New Brunswick announced that it will be raising the province’s minimum wage from $11.00 to $11.25 on April 1, 2018. The go…

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Minimum Wage Forum

Date: Mar 28, 20187:30 am – 11:30 am (ET)
Special One-Time Forum to Discuss the Impact of Minimum Wage
Over the coming year, several provincial governments across Canada already have or will be legislating major changes to existing labour reg…

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For members with stores in Nova Scotia: City of Halifax Votes Against Ban on Single Use Plastic Bags – RCC Working with Nova Scotia Government on Provincial Solution

For members with stores in Nova Scotia: City of Halifax Votes Against Ban on Single Use Plastic Bags – RCC Working with Nova Scotia Government on Provincial Solution
PrintJanuary 23, 2018Last week, Halifax Regional Council voted against a motion to ban…

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For members with stores in Alberta: Used Oil Program Amalgamated into Alberta Recycling

For members with stores in Alberta: Used Oil Program Amalgamated into Alberta Recycling
PrintJanuary 19, 2018The Government of Alberta has determined that the used oil materials recycling program, currently managed by the Alberta Used Oil Management A…

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For members with stores in B.C.: Government revises regulatory definitions of printed paper and packaging

For members with stores in B.C.: Government revises regulatory definitions of printed paper and packaging
PrintJanuary 19, 2018Effective November 14, 2017, the B.C. government amended the Recycling Regulation in six material respects:\

amended the “…

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Québec – 2018 minimum wage increase

Québec – 2018 minimum wage increase
PrintJanuary 19, 2018On January 17, 2018, Labour Minister Dominique Vien announced a 75-cent increase in the minimum hourly wage effective May 1, 2018. The increase was more than the 50 cents expected under the minim…

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For members with stores in Victoria: City of Victoria bans plastic bags, regulates paper and reusable bags

For members with stores in Victoria: City of Victoria bans plastic bags, regulates paper and reusable bags
PrintJanuary 12, 2018The City of Victoria has passed a bylaw which, effective July 1, 2018, would:
• ban the distribution of single-use plastic s…

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Nova Scotia Implements a Temporary Decision on Plastic Film Disposal

Nova Scotia Implements a Temporary Decision on Plastic Film Disposal
PrintJanuary 5, 2018The Nova Scotia Department of Environment has given itself a temporary reprieve from the ongoing challenge faced by its municipalities in finding new markets for /…

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For members with stores in Alberta: Significant Changes to Workers’ Compensation Act and Occupational Health and Safety Act

For members with stores in Alberta: Significant Changes to Workers’ Compensation Act and Occupational Health and Safety Act

Print

December 1, 2017

Alberta’s NDP Government introduced Bill 30 this week, an Act to Protect the Health and Well-being of Working Albertans.  The legislation proposes amendments to the Occupational Health and Safety Act, as well as Workers’ Compensation Act, and is intended to enhance employee rights, as well as expand compensation and benefits for injured workers.

The government plans to push the legislation through in its entirety within the next couple weeks, limiting debate. If passed, the Minister of Labour anticipates much of the changes to WCB would take effect January 1, 2018, with the majority of OHS changes taking effect June 1, 2018. Some of the more complex aspects would be rolled out later in 2018.

Changes to the WCB system will cost an additional $94.5 million annually, funded using the agency’s Accident Fund, established using surplus employer premiums.  The fund currently contains approximately $10.5 billion and RCC has long advocated for these funds to be rebated to employers.

OVERVIEW:

Key proposed changes to the WCB system:

• Remove the cap for maximum insurable earnings, currently set at $98,700 per year, so that injured workers earning above this rate would be able to receive 90% of their annual earnings.
• Create a lump-sum fatality benefit of $90,772.20 for family of workers who die on the job.
• Provide WCB appeals commission two years to launch formal reviews (currently one year).
• Create a fair practices office to help workers navigate the WCB system.
• Extend coverage for psychological injuries, PTSD, for all occupations.

Key proposed changes to the OHS Act:

• Enshrining the right for employees to refuse dangerous work, bringing Alberta into line with other Canadian provinces. Employees would still be paid while their refusal to work is investigated.
• Employers with 20 or more workers will be required to create a joint work site health and safety committee if work lasts 90 days or more. Smaller employers with five to 19 workers will need to have a health and safety representative. Alberta is currently the only province without such committees.
• A serious injury would be reported when a worker is admitted to hospital. Currently, the threshold for reporting a serious injury is a two-day hospitalization.
• Employers will be required to report “near miss” incidents to OHS, referring to a situation that might have caused serious injury but didn’t.
• Definitions for workplace violence and harassment will be expanded to include threats and coercion.
• OHS laws will be reviewed every five years.

NEXT STEPS:

• RCC will actively follow the progress of the legislation over the next couple of weeks.
• RCC will write Labour Minister Christina Gray to outline the retail industry’s concerns with the Government’s use of rebatable employer premiums to fund this program. We will also be highlighting our concerns with the additional red tape and regulation created, and overall impact additional costs have on our sector’s competitiveness.
• RCC will reach out to other business stakeholders to ensure we share our concerns.

If you have any questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to contact: John Graham, Director, Government Relations (Prairie Region) at 204.926.8624 or jgraham@retailcouncil.org

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For Members with stores in Alberta: Alberta Consumer Protection Legislation Introduced

For Members with stores in Alberta: Alberta Consumer Protection Legislation Introduced

Print

December 1, 2017

As anticipated, on November 29, 2017 the Alberta Government introduced Bill 31, A Better Deal for Consumers and Businesses Act, designed to level the playing field for Alberta businesses and improve protections for Albertans making buying decisions.

RCC has been actively involved in the consultation process and was successful in addressing all elements of concern, including those that would have potentially seen the regulation of standardized pricing, return, and refund policies.  

Bill 31 introduces a Consumer Bill of Rights intended to better inform and protect consumers making purchasing decisions, including those buying or repairing a car, buying concert tickets, taking out a loan or getting medical care for their pets.  The legislation will also result in the renaming of the Fair Trading Act to the Consumer Protection Act, to focus the purpose of the act more clearly.

Features of Bill 31:

Online Ticket sales: New rules will prohibit the use of software (i.e., bots) for purchasing tickets and require secondary sellers and ticketing platforms to provide a full refund if the event is cancelled or a ticket is counterfeit or invalid.

Car Sales and Repairs: New rules will require sellers to disclose a vehicle’s history and provide a standard bill of sale. Auto repair shops will be expected to provide minimum warranty protections and provide written estimates in advance of the work being completed.

Veterinary services:  New protections for pet owners will be introduced, including requiring the disclosure of all fees before administering any veterinary services or treatments for household pets (excluding emergencies).

High-Cost Credit Products:  Protections for borrowers of high-cost credit products (defined as 32% plus) will be established, including the use of standard contract formats so that consumers can better understand the nature of high cost credit, and the establishment of licensing requirements for high-interest lenders.

Fairness Between Consumers and Businesses:
• New rules will restrict unilateral amendments to contracts without informing the consumer, and provide consumers with the option of cancelling the agreement;
• Disallow clauses that prevent consumers from posting negative business reviews;
• Allow consumers who file a complaint in good faith or issue a negative review to better protect themselves from legal recourse;
• Enable Government to publicly release information about charges, convictions and other enforcement actions taken under the act.

Once the legislation passes, Service Alberta is expected to move forward with the development of regulations during the first half of 2018.  

Next Steps:

• RCC will remain activity involved throughout the draft regulation process.
• RCC will also work with the government to ensure support is made available for members that require guidance in the amendment of there current business practices.

If you have any questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to contact: John Graham, Director, Government Relations (Prairie Region) at 204.926.8624 or jgraham@retailcouncil.org

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Holiday Shopping brought to you by York Region

Holiday Shopping brought to you by York Region

Print

November 24, 2017

Effective January 1, 2018, retailers will be able to be open for business in York Region on all statutory holidays except Christmas Day.  This is a significant change as previously retailers had to be closed for statutory holidays based on the provincial Retail Business Holiday Act unless a tourist exemption was granted.  York Region is the third largest in Ontario comprised of Aurora, East Gwillimbury, Georgina, King, Markham, New Market Richmond Hill Vaughan and Whitchurch-Stouffville.

This decision represents an important municipal change in direction as it supports RCC’s approach that retailers should be deciding at their discretion whether to be open on statutory holidays without restrictions imposed by governments.  RCC expects other municipalities to review bylaws that address holiday shopping.
Recently the City of Toronto missed an opportunity to change its Holiday Shopping bylaw and amended only the definition for prepared food.  This was in response to a court case that resulted from a grocery retailer being open on a statutory holiday in the City of Toronto.  RCC tried to get City Council to consider a much broader review of the bylaw without success.

Next Steps:

Peel region, the second largest in the Province, will be conducting consultations on their shopping bylaw in the first half of 2018.  RCC will be participating in those consultations and will pursue the position of letting business decide when to be open as the retail environment is constantly evolving and retailers must adapt to stay relevant in the marketplace.

If you have any questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to contact: Gary Rygus, Director, Government Relations (Ontario) at (416) 467-3744

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For members with stores in Ontario: Ontario Government Legislates Minimum Wage Changes

For members with stores in Ontario: Ontario Government Legislates Minimum Wage Changes

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November 23, 2017

As anticipated, the Ontario Legislature yesterday passed Bill 148, which enacts the January 1, 2018 minimum wage increase to $14/hour, the January 1, 2019 increase to $15/hour and other measures related to the Employment Standards Act and Labour Relations Act.  Given the Liberal majority in the Ontario Legislature, the implementation of the changes contained in Bill 148 has been a foregone conclusion since they were first announced in Spring 2017.

Retail Council of Canada continues to be strongly critical of the pace of the minimum wage change and was the first Ontario business association to appear on the issue on the opening day of the Finance Committee hearings in Thunder Bay.  RCC has worked with the Keep Ontario Working coalition, along with the Ontario Chamber of Commerce, Canadian Franchise Association, Restaurants Canada and 11 other associations in expressing our deep concern about a 30%+ increase to the minimum wage over a mere 18 months.

At the same time, recognizing the inevitability of passage of Bill 148 by a majority government, and the government’s determination to promote the $15/hour message through advertising and in all public pronouncements, RCC developed a three-phased strategy for engagement: seeking concessions in the pre-impact period (i.e., announced prior to January 1, 2018); further mitigation in the run-up to the next provincial budget expected in March or April 2018; and lastly, slowing the pace of adoption of the second increase from $14/hour to $15/hour, following the next election, which will be held on June 7, 2018.
Jointly with Restaurant Canada, RCC met with the senior decision-makers from both Government and Opposition and launched a website campaign, www.protectfirstjobs.com, knowing that younger workers are particularly vulnerable to major changes to the minimum wage and that this is an important socio-economic and political constituency for the Liberal government.  In its Fall Economic Statement, released on November 14, the government announced some modest measures targeted at small and medium-sized enterprise (SMEs), including a reduction in the small business tax rate from 4.5% to 3.5% and a $2,000 incentive for hiring and retention of each new young worker hired under age 30.
While RCC will continue to advocate that the incentive should apply more broadly than to new hires and SMEs, RCC notes that a $2,000 incentive covers 40% of the first-year impact of the minimum wage increase on the cost of hiring a young full-time employee (and a greater percentage of the incremental cost of new part-time employees). 

Going forward into 2018, RCC will push for the expansion of this program through the next provincial budget, along with other measures to help mitigate the effects that Bill 148 may have on employment, prices and business earnings.  The opportunity will also exist to raise retail industry concerns in the platform development process leading in to the election.
Our third-phase of activity looks at the longer term and the potential to slow the pace of the second hike from $14/hour to $15/hour.  The Progressive Conservative party has already committed to phase this in at $0.25 a year over four years, see: https://www.ontariopc.ca/fall_economic_statement_shows_ontario_families_deserve_a_more_responsible_approach_to_the_economy_ontario_pcs – a rate roughly comparable to annual indexation at the level of inflation, which was the method used in Ontario prior to the Government’s Spring 2017 announcement.  This would require new legislation if the Progressive Conservative Party forms the next Government of Ontario.

The other measures contained in Bill 148 are too numerous to address in a Member Notice but are well-summarized at the Ministry of Labour website: https://www.ontario.ca/page/plan-fair-workplaces-and-better-jobs-bill-148.  Retail Council will issue further guidance on the new legislation once all implementation details are settled, including the review currently underway of exceptions to certain provisions of the Employment Standards Act.

If you have any questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to contact: Karl Littler, Vice-President, Public Affairs at 416-467-3783 or klittler@retailcouncil.org

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For members with stores in Ontario: Ontario Government Legislates Minimum Wage Changes

For members with stores in Ontario: Ontario Government Legislates Minimum Wage Changes

Print

November 23, 2017

As anticipated, the Ontario Legislature yesterday passed Bill 148, which enacts the January 1, 2018 minimum wage increase to $14/hour, the January 1, 2019 increase to $15/hour and other measures related to the Employment Standards Act and Labour Relations Act.  Given the Liberal majority in the Ontario Legislature, the implementation of the changes contained in Bill 148 has been a foregone conclusion since they were first announced in Spring 2017.

Retail Council of Canada continues to be strongly critical of the pace of the minimum wage change and was the first Ontario business association to appear on the issue on the opening day of the Finance Committee hearings in Thunder Bay.  RCC has worked with the Keep Ontario Working coalition, along with the Ontario Chamber of Commerce, Canadian Franchise Association, Restaurants Canada and 11 other associations in expressing our deep concern about a 30%+ increase to the minimum wage over a mere 18 months.
At the same time, recognizing the inevitability of passage of Bill 148 by a majority government, and the government’s determination to promote the $15/hour message through advertising and in all public pronouncements, RCC developed a three-phased strategy for engagement: seeking concessions in the pre-impact period (i.e., announced prior to January 1, 2018); further mitigation in the run-up to the next provincial budget expected in March or April 2018; and lastly, slowing the pace of adoption of the second increase from $14/hour to $15/hour, following the next election, which will be held on June 7, 2018.
Jointly with Restaurant Canada, RCC met with the senior decision-makers from both Government and Opposition and launched a website campaign, www.protectfirstjobs.com, knowing that younger workers are particularly vulnerable to major changes to the minimum wage and that this is an important socio-economic and political constituency for the Liberal government.  In its Fall Economic Statement, released on November 14, the government announced some modest measures targeted at small and medium-sized enterprise (SMEs), including a reduction in the small business tax rate from 4.5% to 3.5% and a $2,000 incentive for hiring and retention of each new young worker hired under age 30.
While RCC will continue to advocate that the incentive should apply more broadly than to new hires and SMEs, RCC notes that a $2,000 incentive covers 40% of the first-year impact of the minimum wage increase on the cost of hiring a young full-time employee (and a greater percentage of the incremental cost of new part-time employees). 
Going forward into 2018, RCC will push for the expansion of this program through the next provincial budget, along with other measures to help mitigate the effects that Bill 148 may have on employment, prices and business earnings.  The opportunity will also exist to raise retail industry concerns in the platform development process leading in to the election.
Our third-phase of activity looks at the longer term and the potential to slow the pace of the second hike from $14/hour to $15/hour.  The Progressive Conservative party has already committed to phase this in at $0.25 a year over four years, see: https://www.ontariopc.ca/fall_economic_statement_shows_ontario_families_deserve_a_more_responsible_approach_to_the_economy_ontario_pcs – a rate roughly comparable to annual indexation at the level of inflation, which was the method used in Ontario prior to the Government’s Spring 2017 announcement.  This would require new legislation if the Progressive Conservative Party forms the next Government of Ontario.
The other measures contained in Bill 148 are too numerous to address in a Member Notice but are well-summarized at the Ministry of Labour website: https://www.ontario.ca/page/plan-fair-workplaces-and-better-jobs-bill-148.  Retail Council will issue further guidance on the new legislation once all implementation details are settled, including the review currently underway of exceptions to certain provisions of the Employment Standards Act.

If you have any questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to contact: Karl Littler, Vice-President, Public Affairs at 416-467-3783 or klittler@retailcouncil.org

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For members with stores in Ontario: Ontario Government Legislates Minimum Wage Changes

For members with stores in Ontario: Ontario Government Legislates Minimum Wage Changes

Print

November 23, 2017

As anticipated, the Ontario Legislature yesterday passed Bill 148, which enacts the January 1, 2018 minimum wage increase to $14/hour, the January 1, 2019 increase to $15/hour and other measures related to the Employment Standards Act and Labour Relations Act.  Given the Liberal majority in the Ontario Legislature, the implementation of the changes contained in Bill 148 has been a foregone conclusion since they were first announced in Spring 2017.

Retail Council of Canada continues to be strongly critical of the pace of the minimum wage change and was the first Ontario business association to appear on the issue on the opening day of the Finance Committee hearings in Thunder Bay.  RCC has worked with the Keep Ontario Working coalition, along with the Ontario Chamber of Commerce, Canadian Franchise Association, Restaurants Canada and 11 other associations in expressing our deep concern about a 30%+ increase to the minimum wage over a mere 18 months.
At the same time, recognizing the inevitability of passage of Bill 148 by a majority government, and the government’s determination to promote the $15/hour message through advertising and in all public pronouncements, RCC developed a three-phased strategy for engagement: seeking concessions in the pre-impact period (i.e., announced prior to January 1, 2018); further mitigation in the run-up to the next provincial budget expected in March or April 2018; and lastly, slowing the pace of adoption of the second increase from $14/hour to $15/hour, following the next election, which will be held on June 7, 2018.
Jointly with Restaurant Canada, RCC met with the senior decision-makers from both Government and Opposition and launched a website campaign, www.protectfirstjobs.com, knowing that younger workers are particularly vulnerable to major changes to the minimum wage and that this is an important socio-economic and political constituency for the Liberal government.  In its Fall Economic Statement, released on November 14, the government announced some modest measures targeted at small and medium-sized enterprise (SMEs), including a reduction in the small business tax rate from 4.5% to 3.5% and a $2,000 incentive for hiring and retention of each new young worker hired under age 30.
While RCC will continue to advocate that the incentive should apply more broadly than to new hires and SMEs, RCC notes that a $2,000 incentive covers 40% of the first-year impact of the minimum wage increase on the cost of hiring a young full-time employee (and a greater percentage of the incremental cost of new part-time employees). 
Going forward into 2018, RCC will push for the expansion of this program through the next provincial budget, along with other measures to help mitigate the effects that Bill 148 may have on employment, prices and business earnings.  The opportunity will also exist to raise retail industry concerns in the platform development process leading in to the election.
Our third-phase of activity looks at the longer term and the potential to slow the pace of the second hike from $14/hour to $15/hour.  The Progressive Conservative party has already committed to phase this in at $0.25 a year over four years, see: https://www.ontariopc.ca/fall_economic_statement_shows_ontario_families_deserve_a_more_responsible_approach_to_the_economy_ontario_pcs – a rate roughly comparable to annual indexation at the level of inflation, which was the method used in Ontario prior to the Government’s Spring 2017 announcement.  This would require new legislation if the Progressive Conservative Party forms the next Government of Ontario.
The other measures contained in Bill 148 are too numerous to address in a Member Notice but are well-summarized at the Ministry of Labour website: https://www.ontario.ca/page/plan-fair-workplaces-and-better-jobs-bill-148.  Retail Council will issue further guidance on the new legislation once all implementation details are settled, including the review currently underway of exceptions to certain provisions of the Employment Standards Act.

If you have any questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to contact: Karl Littler, Vice-President, Public Affairs at 416-467-3783 or klittler@retailcouncil.org

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LIMA Canada: CREATIVITY in LICENSING

Date: 
Nov 30, 2017

Join us for LIMA Canada’s next event

CREATIVITY in LICENSING

Expect great networking, exciting speakers and delicious food & refreshments.

SEARCHING FOR “NEW”

Licensing is a business built on “new.” Whether you’re a brand owner or licensee, you’re constantly trying to develop new product concepts, fresh ways of bringing products to market, untapped distribution and marketing channels, and other ways to tap into an always changing consumer marketplace. Our speakers will address how they and their companies seek out and implement new ideas, and how that’s ultimately reflected in how they go to market.

Speakers: 
Ben Dermer, Vice President/Creative Director, Spin Master
Bobby Sahni, Partner/Co-Founder, Ethnicity Multicultural Marketing + Advertising
Joe Mimran, Founder/Joe Fresh, Club Monaco, Alfred Sung, Caban. Dragon/CBC’s Dragons’ Den

Click here to register for the event! 

 

 

Corus Entertainment
25 Dockside Drive
Toronto, ON

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Bricks and Mortar Presentations

Bricks and Mortar Presentations

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Thank you to all of our attendees who participated in our Bricks and Mortar Forum on November 21st 2017!

Please see below for the speaker presentations: 

1) Link one
2) Link two 
3) Link three 

If you have any questions or comments, please do not hestiate to reach out to our team at events@retailcouncil.org 

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WorkSafeNB Increases Employer Premiums By 15% / Stakeholders Demand Changes to WCAT Policy Making Authority

WorkSafeNB Increases Employer Premiums By 15% / Stakeholders Demand Changes to WCAT Policy Making Authority

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November 13, 2017

After an average increase of 33% in employer premiums for 2017, WorkSafeNB announced this fall that rates for 2018 will increase by an average of 15%. Actuarial forecasts pegged the 2018 increase at 60% but WorkSafeNB intervened and artificially lowered the employer rate by dropping WorkSafe’s funding target from 110% to 100% funded. WorkSafeNB Board policy mandates that when the funding level dips below 110%, action must be taken within eight years to bring the funding level back to at least 110%. On its own, this decision will add premium surcharges to employers.

Retail Council of Canada (RCC) continues to work with the Coalition of New Brunswick Employers to not only oppose the increases but to call for legislative change to the province’s Workers’ Compensation Act that would bring balance to the system.

Background:

In 2015, the New Brunswick government created the Workers’ Compensation Appeals Tribunal (WCAT). RCC has no issue with a legislated ability for employees to appeal workers’ compensation decisions to an independent WCAT. However, the province’s legislation has not only provided WCAT with the power to overrule WorkSafeNB decisions but with the ability to interpret and nullify WorkSafeNB policy. Further troubling is the fact that there is little in the current legislation to prevent WCAT decisions from being retroactive. WCAT in New Brunswick has more authority than is seen with appeals tribunals anywhere else in Canada. Unlike WorkSafeNB, WCAT does not have a mandate to consider the overall health of the workers’ compensation system and thus, the shortcomings of the current system are being exposed by WCAT decisions. Statistics from the past year show that appeals to WCAT have had a success rate of over 90%. Overruling WorkSafeNB decisions has quickly increased immediate and future costs to the system and thus, to New Brunswick employers.

An example of the impact of WCAT’s policy making decisions is seen in how a compensable injury or disease is determined.  For years, such a determination was based on a preponderance of evidence whereas now, there is a presumption in favour of the worker. Furthermore, the conditions affecting continuation of a loss time claim are now subject to a presumptive standard of evidence. For instance, when employees are on claim, WorkSafeNB is now allowing them to prolong their time off work due to non-compensable intervening conditions (e.g. personal conditions).

These decisions have become the driving force behind the significant increases in benefit costs. Actuarial reports show that without legislative change, significant increases in employer premiums will continue for at least the next two years. Under the current system, New Brunswick could have the second highest benefit costs in Canada by the end of 2018.

Workers’ compensation is an insurance program that must follow strict rules regarding its balance sheet and thus, there is little that can be done without a commitment from government to make legislative change.

Next Steps:

The provincial election in 2018 has regrettably turned the issues with WorkSafeNB into a game of partisan, political rhetoric. The government does not seem interested in introducing legislation that would upset the labour movement in the lead up to next year’s election. Therefore, the prospect of legislative change before 2019 is slim.

The WorkSafeNB Stakeholder Advisory Group has spent much of 2017 examining New Brunswick’s Workers’ Compensation system. The Advisory Group consists of employer and worker representatives. RCC will be appearing before the Advisory Group in November 2017 and will continue to call for legislative change.

RCC will continue to advocate on behalf of members for a workers’ compensation system in New Brunswick that is fair with predictable, affordable and with sustainable costs. Such a system is needed to protect employees, safeguard jobs and improve the business environment.

If you have any questions or concerns, please don’t hesitate to contact: Jim Cormier, Director (Atlantic) at:  jcormier@retailcouncil.org or (902) 422-4144

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Cost-Saving Measures for Small Retailers Announced by Ontario Government

Cost-Saving Measures for Small Retailers Announced by Ontario Government

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November 14, 2017

Today’s Fall Economic Statement (FES) from the Ontario Government contains several measures of interest to Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs).

The first is the announcement of a reduction in the small business tax rate from 4.5% to 3.5%, effective January 1, 2018.

Taken together with recently announced reductions in the federal small business tax rate (from 11 per cent today to 10 per cent in 2018, with a further reduction to 9 per cent in 2019), the combined small business tax rate in Ontario will be reduced from 15% in 2017 to 13.5% in 2018 and to 12.5% by 2019.

In addition, the Ontario Government has announced hiring and retention incentives for SMEs making new hires of employees under age 30, effective January 1, 2018. For these purposes, SMEs include independents, franchises, or dealers with fewer than 100 employees (see note below re Design Issues).

The incentive will pay the employer $1000 on hiring and a further $1000 at the employee’s six-month mark for a total of $2000. This measure is a modest response to concerns expressed by Retail Council of Canada in its www.protectfirstjobs.com campaign. The value of this program is estimated at $104 million but we anticipate that the government will continue to support the program even if demand exceeds that estimate.

While we believe and will continue to advocate that the incentive should apply more broadly than to new hires and SMEs, RCC notes that a $2000 incentive covers 40% of the first-year impact of the minimum wage increase on the cost of hiring a young full-time employee (and a greater percentage of the incremental cost of new part-time employees).

New Youth Hire Calculation

In order to be eligible for this incentive, employers will be required to make these hires through Employment Ontario, which is a service open to any interested job-seeker and employer.

Design Issues

  • RCC presumes that the measure will be limited to SME employers with fewer than 100 FTEs (full-time employees or equivalent in part-time hours) but that issue was unsettled at the time of today’s release.
  • As stated, today’s $2000 incentive measure applies to new hires whether they are full-time or part-time employees. RCC expects that the government may decide to put measures in place to stipulate a minimum number of hours for an employee’s eligibility for the program.
  • Summer students will be eligible for the first $1000 incentive but not for the retention bonus (unless they stay on as employees for six months).

RCC will work with the Ontario Government to ensure that these measures are implemented in a manner that works with the operational and staffing needs of retail merchants. RCC will provide further advice to members on how to access the program as the details are finalized.

If you have any questions or concerns, please don’t hesitate to contact: Karl Littler, Vice President, Public Affairs at: klittler@retailcouncil.org or 416-467-3783

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Fashion Sustainability Meets PLM: tentree’s Business Case

Date: 
Dec 13, 2017

2:00pm ET

Today, all fashion brands need to improve the way they manage merchandising, design, development, sourcing, compliance and operations to stay ahead of the game. But speeding time to market, being competitive or driving business growth doesn’t mean compromising your core values!

Attend our webinar to discover how an environmentally-conscious fashion company can leverage technology, develop a competitive edge and support sustainability initiatives.

Hear from Arthur Kononuk, Creative Director at tentree as he opens up about their PLM success story and explains how Centric’s cloud-based product lifecycle management (PLM) solution helps tentree:

  • manage complexity
  • increase visibility and transparency throughout the produce design & development cycle
  • meet business goals
  • stay true to their environmental DNA

Easy to use and fast to implement, Centric Software’s PLM solutions are designed to accelerate product development, reduce costs and increase market responsiveness.

Want to learn more? Book your spot now! 

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Excellence in Retailing Awards Gala

Date: May 29, 2018Retail Council of Canada takes pride in honoring the very best in retail innovation and creativity at the Excellence in Retailing Awards Gala.
Every year these awards bring together the top talent in the Canadian Retail industry…

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Canadian Grand Prix New Product Awards Gala

Date: May 30, 2018

Now in its 25th year, the Canadian Grand Prix New Product Awards™ is an annual program that celebrates new products in food, non-food and private-label categories.
This awards program provides a unique opportunity for e…

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ShopIn_BricksMortar_Survey

http://www.rccshopin.ca/shopinsights/surveysignup

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For members with stores in Manitoba: Government Announces Climate and Green Plan

For members with stores in Manitoba: Government Announces Climate and Green Plan

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November 2, 2017

The Manitoba provincial government released its Made-in-Manitoba Climate and Green Plan on October 27, 2017, which is built on the strategic pillars of climate, jobs, water and nature, and includes16 keystones for priority action. 

The province is inviting those interested in providing their feedback to complete a survey. The questionnaire and plan are available at: www.manitobaclimategreenplan.ca

Carbon Pricing:
The plan sets out Manitoba’s approach to carbon pricing, that features a $25 a tonne carbon dioxide levy (five cents for each litre of gasoline), that will remain fixed through 2022.   The levy is expected to go into effect mid-2018.  The rate initially exceeds the Federally established standards ($10 a tonne in 2018 / $20 a tonne in 2019), however will fall short of the national standards in the following three years as the rate grows to $50 a tonne by 2022.  The Federal Environment Minister has expressed her expectations that Manitoba will need to adjust their rate in 2020.

The plan confirms exemptions for agricultural emissions and allows for large industrial emitters to participate in an output based pricing system of performance standards, offsets and credit trading.

Enhanced Waste Diversion Programs
The Climate and Green Plan also calls for expanded organic and non-organic waste diversion efforts.  No timelines have been communicated, however some potentially contentious issues RCC will be addressing, include:

Waste Emissions – Organic
The report indicates that considerations include:
• Implement a landfill disposal ban on organic materials.
• Work with food processors, grocers, hotels, restaurants and other stakeholders to promote best composting practices and provide supports and incentives, research, training and market development.
• Increase the Waste Reduction and Recycling Support landfill levy and use the revenue to support compost facilities.
• Develop a comprehensive food waste reduction and prevention initiative, in partnership with other jurisdictions and key community groups.
• Pursue measures to mitigate methane emissions and enhance methane gas capture at landfills.
• Recycle non-organic materials, especially those containing ozone-depleting substances, is also critical to cutting our carbon footprint and creating sustainable communities.

Waste Emissions – Non-Organic
To enhance diversion of non-organic waste from landfills, considerations include:
• Expand the household hazardous material Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) program to include ozone-depleting substances and other halocarbon cylinders, single-use pressurized containers, foam insulation and refillable propane tanks, smoke and carbon monoxide detectors, medical sharps and veterinary products.
• Establish new EPR programs for appliances with refrigerants (e.g., fridges, air conditioners, water coolers) and small appliances.
• Implement landfill disposal bans on materials currently managed by product stewardship organizations, starting with electronic waste, batteries, tires, household hazardous waste, beverage containers and cardboard boxes.
• Introduce measures to increase the diversion of construction, renovation and demolition waste such as wood and shingles.

Next Steps:

• RCC has met with Manitoba Sustainable Development and will continue to follow the consultation process.
• RCC will request a meeting Minister Rochelle Squires to outline retail industry viewpoint on waste diversion programs (industry lead, harmonization, results focused).
• RCC will reach out to other business stakeholders to ensure we share our concerns about the broad proposals.

RCC will forward additional materials as they become available.

If you have any questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to contact: John Graham, Director, Government Relations (Prairie Region) at 204.926.8624 or jgraham@retailcouncil.org

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For members with stores in Alberta: Alberta Consumer Protection Proposals

For members with stores in Alberta: Alberta Consumer Protection Proposals

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November 2, 2017

The Alberta NDP Government made a commitment in their March 2, 2017 throne speech to strengthen consumer protection laws and introduce a Consumer Bill of Rights. 

Throughout July, August and September, Service Alberta met with interested stakeholders and consulted Albertans to help inform changes to Alberta’s existing consumer protection laws.  In addition, the Ministry met directly with RCC and other stakeholders to discuss consumer protection issues and possible solutions.
 

Current Status:

Service Alberta is now looking at moving forward with draft legislation that will result in:

1. Renaming the Fair Trading Act to the Consumer Protection Act.

2. Provide the Minister the authority to craft a Consumer Bill of Rights as a policy document intended to bring together all the components in the Consumer Protection Act.  The Consumer Bill of Rights will neither add new nor change existing rights.

3. Give the Minister the authority to require automobile dealerships to disclose key vehicle information to consumers including: requiring a standard bill of sale, the establishment of written estimates, time-dated authorization to proceed and a minimum warranty.

4. New Consumer Protection Act provisions intended to prevent businesses from being able to make unilateral amendments to contracts, providing the customer the ability to terminate the contract and requiring certain measures are undertaken including notice provision.

5. Truth in pricing provisions that would provide government the ability to regulate a standardized pricing, return, and, refund policies.
Government anticipates that the legislation will be introduced in December 2017 with regulations developed during the first half of 2018.

Next Steps:

• RCC will activity follow the progress on the legislation.
• RCC will work with Service Alberta to ensure any concerns are addressed (conflicts with retail scanner accuracy policy, harmonization and flexibility).
• RCC will write Minister Stephanie McLean to outline outstanding retail industry issues once the legislation is introduced.
• RCC will reach out to other business stakeholders to ensure we share our concerns about the proposals.

If you have any questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to contact: John Graham, Director, Government Relations (Prairie Region) at 204.926.8624 or jgraham@retailcouncil.org
 

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NRF 2018: Retail’s Big Show

Date: Jan 14, 2018 to Jan 16, 2018http://www.retailcouncil.org/sites/default/files/NRF_RegistrationForm_2018.pdf

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