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Steve Paikin: Patrick Brown’s astonishing ascent in the Ontario PC Party leadership race

Several years ago, on a flight from Ottawa to Toronto, the fella sitting across the aisle struck up a conversation. He mentioned we’d met many years earlier—when he was a young conservative activist. I had to confess, I didn’t remember him. He re-introduced himself.

“I’m Patrick Brown,” he said.

“Nice to see you again, Patrick,” I replied. “And what do you do now?”

“I’m the MP for Barrie,” he responded politely.

As a guy who follows politics pretty carefully, both provincially and federally, I was embarrassed I didn’t recognize him. Then again, I thought, does it say something about an MP that a guy who follows politics that carefully has no clue who he is?

Brown has been a federal Conservative MP since 2006, but over the last decade, he’s been a rare sighting at Queen’s Park, where he hopes to soon be the leader of the provincial Tories (he’s also a difficult guy to miss—he’s a dead ringer for the best basketball player to ever come out of Canada, future Hall of Famer, Steve Nash).

And yet Brown’s the front-runner among signed-up members.  

Brown is fond of saying he has traveled all over the province and gone to innumerable so-called “ethnic community events,” but he’s “never seen anyone from the provincial party at these events.” He’s been to India more than a dozen times and calls the country’s new Prime Minister Narinder Modi a friend. He feels comfortable in parts of the province where the PC Party hasn’t been competitive for more than 10 years.

Brown’s camp quickly figured out something Elliott’s camp didn’t: the past months haven’t been about developing policy, landing high-profile endorsements, or raising money. Elliott clearly won that campaign. The party caucus is overwhelmingly behind her, and she has the support of big names, such as former Premiers Bill Davis and Mike Harris and the Ford brothers.

But as Elliott lined up all that, Brown and his people were out selling, selling, selling. They shocked long-time Tories several weeks ago, when the party revealed the Brown campaign sold more than 40,000 memberships – a higher number than the combined total of all four candidates during the last PC Party leadership campaign six years ago.

Brown’s willingness to discuss issues and policy is weak. During a leadership candidates’ debate on The Agenda last Friday, Brown either couldn’t or wouldn’t name a single tax policy change he’d make as PC leader. Elliott proposed cutting the corporate tax rate by one billion dollars over several years.

But perhaps Conservatives don’t care much about policy—at least, not at this stage. One MPP told me he’s supporting Elliott not because of her political views, but because he thinks she has a better chance of winning the next election and he’s “just so sick of losing.” 

On the other hand, Brown can boast he isn’t connected to the past four Ontario PC Party election losses, in particular, Tim Hudak’s disastrous defeat last year when he misguidedly pledged to eliminate 100,000 positions from the public service. Even though Hudak made the announcement in Barrie, Brown had nothing to do with the proposal. He maintains he knew the election was over the minute the words left Hudak’s lips.

(For the record, Elliott also insists she knew nothing about the promise. According to her, Hudak and his inner circle didn’t give the provincial party caucus the opportunity to vet the idea, something she says isn’t going to happen if she’s leader.)

Brown doesn’t have the life experience Elliott does. She’s the mother of triplet sons, one of whom has developmental disabilities, and she lost husband Jim Flaherty, the former federal finance minister, just before the last provincial election.

Brown’s a single man, never married and without any kids. (Although he said at the TVO debate he hopes to get married and have children someday.) I’ve talked to Progressive Conservatives for whom that’s an issue. They wish he had more “real life” experience, presumably because if you’re going to legislate on issues affecting families, it’s good to have one of your own, if only to give you greater empathy in making decisions.

It’s not without precedent for a bachelor to achieve high office in Canada. William Lyon Mackenzie King, Canada’s longest-serving prime minister, was a lifelong bachelor. So, too, was Prime Minister R.B. Bennett. But it is unusual.

Brown’s French is excellent (Elliott’s taking lessons, but she doesn’t speak French off the cuff; only in speeches), and he has improved his presentation skills significantly over the course of the campaign. He also hasn’t made a single memorable speech during the leadership race—but again, maybe he doesn’t need to.

Winning the party leadership is actually quite simple: sign up more members than your opponent and make sure they come out to vote. Brown’s confident he’s done the first; he thinks the second will follow on May 9 when the vote tallies are revealed.

If he does win, he probably won’t take many more flights where political reporters like me don’t recognize him. 

Full Disclosure: My wife is a volunteer advisor for the Christine Elliott campaign. As well, I have participated in Patrick Brown’s charity events to raise funds for the Royal Victoria Hospital in Barrie.

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Two Nation-Makers: Macdonald and Trudeau

Ruth Abernethy’s marvelous new bust of Canada’s first PM was on site at Queen’s University.

They led different parties and governed in different centuries. But University of Toronto law professor Kent Roach says Sir John A. Macdonald and Pierre Elliott Trudeau, as nation-makers, had a lot in common.

Not only that both prime ministers achieved their crowning achievements after losing elections, then returning to power with subsequent victories.

For Macdonald, it was the creation of the railway; for Trudeau, a repatriated Constitution with an accompanying Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

“Both the railway and the Charter bind us together as Canadians from coast to coast,” Roach told a conference at Queen’s University in Kingston, on the occasion of the 199th anniversary of Macdonald’s birth on January 11th.

U of T Law Professor Kent Roach at the Macdonald “Canada Then and Now” Conference on Saturday, January 11, 2014.

The two were also great compromisers, Roach says.  Macdonald needed to be a skilled compromiser to make Confederation happen in 1867. Trudeau needed those same skills in 1981 when he accepted the “notwithstanding” clause in the Constitution, thereby ensuring the support of nine of the country’s provinces. (Quebec has technically still not “signed on”).

The two former PMs also had the same attitude to provincial power. Neither was amused or impressed with it. Having watched the American states kill half a million of their brothers in the U.S. Civil War, Macdonald was adamant that provinces not have similar powers to rip Canada apart.

Similarly, Trudeau was determined to repatriate the Constitution, despite having eight provinces opposing him for almost the entire negotiating period (only Ontario and New Brunswick were initially with Trudeau).

However, Roach adds, both men also had blind spots when it came to dealing with indigenous Canadians. “They failed to understand those issues and made mistakes.”

Macdonald perpetuated the tragedy of residential schools and had Metis leader Louis Riel executed. Trudeau suffered through a strong backlash in 1969, when his white paper on aboriginal affairs suggested eliminating treaties between First Nations and the Crown.

“Our two greatest nation builders had significant uncompleted business here,” says Roach.

A full house was on hand at Kingston City Hall to celebrate Macdonald’s 199th birthday.

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Celebrating 100 Years of Fenway Park: Part II

Last Friday, on the 100th anniversary of Fenway Park, I posted this history of America's most beloved ball park. 

Larry and Steve Paikin, on their first trip to Fenway Park, July 1978. 

We continue the celebration of Fenway's 100th today by pulling out some of my old scrap books. My love for this ball park goes back three-and-a-half decades.

When I graduated from high school, my father offered to take me on a road trip. Without a second's hesitation, I said: "Let's go to Fenway Park."

 

Sox catcher Carlton Fisk returns to the dugout. He and Yankees' catcher Thurman Munson were great rivals. 

And so we did. It was July 1978. The Red Sox swept the Baltimore Orioles. What kind of team did the Sox have that year? Unstoppable, or so I thought. Every single player in the starting nine was hitting over .300, and when we left Boston, the Sox had a 14-game lead over the second place (hated) New York Yankees.

Pitcher Luis Tiant and centre fielder Fred Lynn coming off the field. Lynn was sensational, winning MVP and Rookie of the Year in his first season in the majors in 1975.

We felt confident the Sox were well on their way to ending The Curse of the Bambino, the excuse New Englanders gave to explain why the team had come oh so close but had never won a championship since they traded Babe Ruth to the Yankees, after winning the World Series in 1918.

We bumped into the Orioles at our hotel, here with Hall of Fame pitcher Jim Palmer …

… and again with another Hall of Famer, first baseman Eddie Murray. 

A return trip to Fenway Park in the mid-1980s. 

Baseball fans will remember 1978 as the year the Sox collapsed, the Yanks found their mojo, and both teams were tied after 162 games. A 163rd sudden death playoff game was played at Fenway Park to see who would go on to post-season play. In that game, "Bucky F—–g Dent" (as he's now referred to by Red Sox Nation) hit an improbable homer over the Green Monster to give the Yanks the win.

Standing outside the stadium beside the statue of Ted Williams, my favourite player ever. I'm wearing his #9 jersey, and named one of my kids "Teddy" after him. 

It was a good lesson for yours truly that much more suffering would be required before we Sox fans could celebrate a championship.

That happened in 2004 — the club's first in 86 years — and again in 2007. 

The most popular Red Sox player today: designated hitter "Big Papi" David Ortiz.

With my son Henry, the third generation of Paikin Red Sox fans, in the summer of 2007.

My most recent trip to Fenway: June 2010, celebrating my 50th birthday with my mom Marnie.

We saw Daniel Nava hit a grand slam homer on the first pitch he ever saw in the majors. That had only happened once before in Major League history. 

Red Sox Captain, catcher Jason Varitek, who has caught four no-hitters during his career. No one else has ever done that. 

Pitcher Daisuke Matsuzaka, on whom the Sox spent $50 million just so he'd leave Japan.

Second baseman Dustin Pedroia, another of the Sox most popular (and best) players.

Can there possibly be a more beautiful place to watch baseball than 100-year-old Fenway Park? I say no. 

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41 Years Ago Today, William Davis Became Premier

Ready for a little nostalgia?
Check out this documentary I did many moons ago, on the 25th anniversary of William Davis's becoming the 18th Premier of Ontario.
Today, March 1, 2012, is the 41st anniversary of Davis's accession to Ontario's …

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Mr. Speaker on Sir John A.

By Peter Milliken

Former House Speaker Peter Milliken, yours truly, and Liberal MP Geoff Regan, at an event at Kingsmere. 
While I served as Kingston’s MP, I remember attending the commemoration of Sir John A. Macdonald on the 100th an…

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Hall of Famer Bob Elliott

We've always known Toronto Sun baseball writer Bob Elliott was one of the best baseball writers around. 
Now the Major League Baseball Hall of Fame knows it too.
Elliott just got voted into the hallowed hall, so we thought we'd bring him i…

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Joe Oliver and The Sundance Kid

Normally, the Canadian natural resources minister is able to do his job with a certain anonymity. Quick now: name any other natural resources minister in Canadian history.  If you can, you're doing better than most.
But these aren't normal…

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Mister or Madam President?

 
Liberals will have four solid but starkly different choices for the person who will lead the behind the scenes effort to rebuild this once venerable Canadian political institution.

They who would be president: Mendes, Copps, Crawley, and Hartli…

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The Drama and Theatre of the Liberals’ Biennial Convention

It may be fashionable to say the Liberal Party of Canada is wheezing its last breaths these days. 
After all, in the last federal election, the party did take licking and is barely still ticking, if you believe its critics. 
But things have h…

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Sorry Peter, They Don’t Look Dead Yet

 

Author and journalist Peter C. Newman really is at the Liberal biennial convention here at the Ottawa Conference Centre.
But even more than that, his latest book appears to haunt the place.
Ever since their worst ever finish in the 20…

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Reviving the Liberal Party of Canada

With members of the Liberal Party of Canada gathering in Ottawa for their biennial convention this weekend, we're shining the spotlight on that once venerable party.
Journalist and author Peter C. Newman has infuriated numerous Grits by writing a b…

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Introducing Brian Topp

Most Canadians had probably never heard of Brian Topp, until his friend and leader, Jack Layton, died.
After all, Topp had never been elected to anything, had worked in the backrooms of NDP provincial governments out West, and rarely seemed to get much…

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The Barrier, The Wall, The Fence

Over the past few weeks, we’ve rolled out a multi-part series of blogposts all related to the extraordinary challenges facing Israelis and Palestinians. A potential modus vivendi seems as far away as ever.
As a result, the Israelis unilaterally c…

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Over To You, Don Drummond

Ontario is "waiting for Drummond."
And unlike Godot, the former federal finance department mandarin and chief economist for the TD Bank is going to show up. Soon. And when he does, all eyes in political Ontario will be upon his reco…

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Palestinians and Human Rights

You could say that Bassem Eid likes to live dangerously.
How so?
Because the founder of the Palestinian Human Rights Monitoring Group is prepared to stand up for the protection of rights regardless of which government is violating them.

Bassem Eid, he…

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The Quest for Palestine

There may be no government in the entire world that sounds more pro-Israel than Canada’s government under Prime Minister Stephen Harper.
The Israelis know it. And the Palestinians do too. And they’re not happy about it.
“We want Canad…

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The Iranian Conundrum

Living in Israel means dealing with a huge set of problems that no other country in the world experiences.
For years, Israel was the Middle East’s underdog, a speck of democracy surrounded by hundreds of millions of hostile Arabs.  And in so…

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The Arab Spring

In the Middle East, it’s all about who’s David and who’s Goliath.
And the problem is, different actors are playing both of those parts all the time.
When it comes to the Israeli-Palestinian problem, Israel clearly has become Goliath t…

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Injustice For All

As we saw in the last blog post, the finish line for an Israeli-Palestinian agreement is actually staring all the parties in the face.
It starts with Israelis having to give up their claims to historic lands such as Hebron and Jericho in what most of t…

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Identity. Legitimacy. Existence

Yossi Klein Halevi disputes today’s conventional wisdom in describing the roots of the Israeli-Palestinian crisis.
“It isn’t borders, it isn’t settlements, it isn’t water rights,” he says.  “It’s all…

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Israelis and Palestinians: Competing Narratives

For many of his 58 years, Yossi Klein Halevi was a journalist. His job was to be as objective as possible.
But he’s changed. He’s made a choice. He’s taken a side. Israel’s side. But he’s quick to stress, that doesn’…

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Yossi Klein Halevi

Yossi Klein Halevi is a guy who needs to be listened to.
I’ve found over the years that, as much as any one person can, his thinking represents a place on the political spectrum where the largest chunk of Israeli public opinion finds itself.
That…

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Israel’s Ultra-Orthodox Problem

It seems in Israel, everything always comes back to religious, ethnic, and gender politics. And the economy is no exception.
People may think of Israel as a fairly homogenous state of Jews and Arabs. But a more careful examination shows a country, perh…

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The Cost of Defending Israel

Can you imagine what would happen to the Canadian economy if, by law, people were required to drop out of it for a month every year?
Welcome to reality in Israel.
Dr. Nadine Baudot-Trajtenberg, associate dean at the Herziliya Business School, estimates…

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The Start Up Nation

While the rest of the world has been suffering under the Great Recession of the past few years, Israel’s economy has been strong.
The country is known as the “Start Up Nation,” because it has the largest concentration of high tech com…

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Israeli Politics 101 – Part 4

Canada’s last federal election on May 2, 2011 may have been a volatile affair by our standards. But compared to what happens in Israeli elections, it was a yawner.
It’s not at all uncommon for political parties in Israel to come out of nowh…

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Israeli Politics 101 – Part 3

In Canada, it’s a slam dunk — win the most number of seats in an election, and your party automatically gets a chance to try to form the government.
In Israel, not so.
The president will call upon whichever party leader he believes has the best…

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Israeli Politics 101 – Part 2

Why are Israeli politics twice as confusing and fascinating as Canadian politics?
Because in Canada, elections tend to be about one thing: the economy. The party that almost always wins is the party that convinces the largest number of voters that it h…

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Israeli Politics 101 – Part 1

This is the time of year when Christian pilgrims visit the Middle East to express their joy over the birth of Jesus.  And given that the holiest sites are both in Israel and the Palestinian territories, that is never a simple feat.  
So, over…

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Race for the White House

With the Iowa caucuses less than three weeks away, here's a blow by blow look at the race for the presidency of the United States with Daily Caller columnist Theo Caldwell.

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Journalists Under Threat

We're in the midst of Countries Week on The Agenda. Each season, in the final week of the calendar year, we shine a spotlight on a handful of countries that are undergoing particularly fascinating times.
This year: Turkey on Monday, Egypt on Tuesda…

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Paul Summerville on Niall Ferguson

University of Victoria business professor Paul Summerville comments on Niall Ferguson's new book "Civilization," and the author's six "killer apps," explaining why The West has won the past 500 years.

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Fighting Corruption in India

University of Toronto political scientist Arthur Rubinoff is about to take his 11th trip to India. In this web-exclusive interview, he explains why getting the corruption out of Indian society is such an enormous challenge.

And if you're curious …

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Maple Leaf Gardens is Alive Again

As a kid growing up in Hamilton and having a mad passion for the hockey team an hour down the Queen Elizabeth Way, Maple Leaf Gardens was one of the most significant buildings I ever spent time in.
I was fortunate that my parents had access to ti…

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Mackenzie King Lives

VideoCabaret brings the history of depression-era Canada to life in The Life and Times of Mackenzie King, now playing at the Cameron House in Toronto.
(Photo by Michael Cooper).
If I've heard it once, I've heard it a thousand times: Canadian…

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Boy, Does This Guy Love Politics

I'm not sure I know anyone who loves politics as much as Arthur Milnes.
Milnes grew up in Scarborough, worked at the Ontario Legislature, went into journalism as well, and somehow, through his travels, has become friends or acquaintances with an ar…

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Paul Hellyer: Still Trying to Change Monetary Policy

He may be 88 years old, but one of the most legendary ex-politicians in Canadian history is still trying to have an impact.
Paul Hellyer won his first election in the Toronto riding of Davenport in the 1949 federal election. At that point in our histo…

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Everything You Always Wanted to Know about Northeastern Ontario

Want to take some time to learn a bit more about a part of the province of Ontario that doesn't always get a lot of attention?
See our interview with Laurentian University professor Dieter K. Buse, who's got all the goods on Northeastern Ontari…

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A Follow-Up on Crown Wards

The subject of last night's program — how crown wards are cut off of support when they turn 18 — came up in the Ontario Legislature's Question Period yesterday. Here's what happened, in an exchange between Monique Taylor (NDP – Ham…

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All in the Family

How's this for an odd couple.
 
Two members of the Ontario Legislature are related to each other.
 
Ernie Hardeman is the uncle. John Vanthof is the nephew.
 
Where it gets interesting: Ernie is the Progressive Conservative memb…

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The Music Show: Follow Up

The feedback from our "Music Show" continues to be most gratifying. If you missed it, you can get more info here.  If you're a fan of The Guess Who or Bachman Turner Overdrive, there's a 50-minute interview with Randy Bachman, pl…

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Remembering Fraser Mustard

Fraser Mustard's is not necessarily a name every Ontarian knows. 
 
But it's a name we should remember. Particularly on a day like today, where friends and admirers gathered at the University of Toronto to pay tribute to his many acco…

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What To Do About Government Spending

 
The McGuinty government unveiled an updated state of the province's finances today (Wednesday, November 23, 2011). 
 
The deficit is worse.  Growth rates are worse. Revenues to the treasury are worse than projected just …

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I Love My New Battery-Powered Car

How mad do you get when you drive by a gas station and see what’s happened to prices over the past few years?
 
I used to.
 
But not anymore. And here’s why.
 
Several months ago, when The Agenda was doing a program at the Ca…

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Backstage with Bill Clinton

Just a few days ago, the Ontario Chamber of Commerce called me.
“Steve,” the spokesman said, “we’ve got Bill Clinton coming to town Monday night at Massey Hall, and we need someone to do an interview with him, on stage, for abou…

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Is Dalton McGuinty the National Liberals’ Best Hope?

Quick, now: who's the most successful Liberal politician in Canada today, who has some national profile?
 
More and more Liberals are coming to believe that person is the current occupant of the premier of Ontario's office, and not without…

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The Munk Debates: Is North America Ready for a Lost Decade?

The Munk Debates have become perhaps the premier event in Canada in offering up some of the biggest names before the biggest audiences debating the biggest issues.
 
Last night before 2,700 people at Roy Thomson Hall, and several thousand more thr…

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Nation Maker

Author and journalist Richard Gwyn has completed his two-volume series on the life and times of Canada's first prime minister, Sir John A. Macdonald. It's must reading for anyone who cares about why our country still exists 144 years after Conf…

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Jazz Goes to the Movies

The Jazz Performance and Education Centre had their third annual gala last night and blew the roof off the George Weston Recital Hall in North York.
 
Heather Bambrick emceed the event, which featured a tentet of some of the country's top jazz…

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Arab Spring, Arab Autumn

Back in the late 1980s and early 1990s, the world watched with fascination as everything we had come to expect from our geopolitically bipolar world changed before our eyes.
 
 
The Cold War, a four-and-a-half-decade long fact of life between…

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The Chairman of the Board: John Robarts @ 50

Fifty years ago today, on October 25, 1961, John P. Robarts won a thrilling six-ballot leadership convention at Varsity Arena, enabling him to become the 17th premier of Ontario. He succeeded Leslie Frost and was eventually sworn in November …

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From the TVO Archives

We've pulled these interview out of the TVO Archives: Dalton McGuinty, Tim Hudak, Andrea Horwath, and Mike Schreiner from many years ago.
 

We did this interview with Dalton McGuinty at Queen's Park just after his government introduced hi…

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A Quickie Assessment of the New McGuinty Cabinet

Here's a quickie assessment of the new McGuinty cabinet, led by Ontario's 24th premier himself.
 

 McGuinty becomes the first Liberal premier since Oliver Mowat, 128 years ago, to win three consecutive elections.
 
 

The o…

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The New McGuinty Cabinet

For the first time in 128 years, a Liberal premier of Ontario has won three consecutive elections. So today, Dalton McGuinty did something no Liberal premier has had to do since Oliver Mowat did it in 1883 — appoint a new ministry to launch a third g…

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What Really Happened in Thornhill?

For the past three elections in Ontario, the riding of Thornhill has always been one of the most closely contested.
 
In 1999, the PCs took it by just 300 votes. In 2003, it flipped over to the the Liberals by 800.  Then in 2007, the Tories t…

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The Bigger (Better?) PC Caucus

Tim Hudak, Ontario's PC Leader, met with most of his 16 new MPPs for the first time on Friday. 
 
He calls them part of his "government in waiting," and assures those who will listen that they will keep the premier "on a sh…

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The Bigger (Better?) NDP

Ontario's New Democrats unveiled their new, bigger caucus next door to Queen's Park yesterday.

Andrea Horwath arrives to the cheers of her new, larger NDP caucus.
 

Re-elected Trinity-Spadina MPP Rosario Marchese introduces his leader.
&…

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Dr. Rob Buckman’s Last Hurrah

We'll talk about cancer tonight on The Agenda. In fact, we'll talk about many of the almost 200 different types of cancers that human beings can be afflicted with.
But with no disrespect to any of the other guests on the program, I'm going …

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The Other Side of 9/11

One month ago, much of the world's attention was focused on memorial services in New York and Washington, on the tenth anniverary of 9/11.
 
The services were solemn. And television covered the events on a gavel to gavel basis.
 
But at t…

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Remembering Rob Buckman

I'll never forget the time Dr.Rob Buckman explained to me, in a televised interview no less, how he defined humour.
 
Essentially, it was the unexpected punch line coming at the end of a conventional set up.  I asked him for an example.
&…

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A Cliffhanger for the History Books

Last night, I started our broadcast by pointing out four different historical markers the leaders were trying to hit. Let’s review them.
 
1. No leader had won back to back to back majority governments in 52 years. Leslie Frost was the last. Dalto…

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A Date with Destiny

Ask anybody who the last premier of Ontario was to win three consecutive majority governments and, unless you’re a political history nerd like me, the likeliest response you’ll get is a very confused, vague expression.
 
That’s b…

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Battle Ground Ontario Map

Our packaging director David Erwin has done a wonderful job tracking the four major party leaders’ whereabouts throughout the election campaign.
 
By seeing where they’ve been, you can figure out which seats or regions of the province each party t…

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I Think My Job’s in Jeopardy

After having moderated five leaders’ debates, I thought I’d finally figured out all the tricks necessary to make them work.
 
Apparently not.  Here’s Sam Barringer, who shows not only how to moderate a debate very skilfully, but also offers t…

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Agenda on the Road: Live from Mississauga Tonight

 
Thanks to yesterday’s day-long AgendaCamp at Mississauga’s Living Arts Centre, The Agenda is good to go, armed with a bucketful of questions for tonight’s broadcast. 
 
 

 
Today wasn’t a great day for Mississauga’s mayor, …

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Agenda on the Road: Mississauga

Over the past year, we’ve taken The Agenda "on the road" to Hamilton, Niagara on the Lake, Sudbury, and Ottawa, in hopes of getting Ontarians to tell us what this election campaign is all about. 
 
Today, we add the final piece to t…

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What You Didn’t See at the Leaders’ Debate

I’ve had the honour of moderating five leaders’ debates. But this one featured some unprecedented behind the scenes incidents, at least in my experience.
 
In the past, whenever the leaders have been ushered on to the debate set just a few minutes…

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Do Leaders’ Debates Matter?

So, tonight’s the night.
 
For the first and only time during this 2011 Ontario general election campaign, the leaders of the three main political parties will be on one stage for 90 minutes, taking questions from Ontarians.
 
I can’t recall …

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Power and Politics

For years now, many people in Peel Region have been protesting the construction of a gas power plant in Mississauga, which has been six years in the making.
 
This weekend, the Ontario Liberals did a volt face on the issue and pulled the plug on t…

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Campaign Lessons from Stephen Harper

Dalton McGuinty has basically spent this election campaign doing two things:
 
* visiting the factories where he thinks tens of thousands of renewable energy jobs will be created
 
* and visiting hospitals where he can announce millions more …

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